Physical exercise and catecholamines response: benefits and health risk: possible mechanisms.

Physical exercise and catecholamines response: benefits and health risk: possible mechanisms. Free Radic Res. 2020 Feb 05;:1-531 Authors: Kruk J, Kotarska K, Aboul-Enein BH Abstract Beneficial effect of regular moderate physical exercise (PE) and negative effect of severe exercise and/or overtraining as an activator of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) have been shown in numerous aspects of human health, including reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, neurological disease, depression, and some types of cancer. Moderate-to-vigorous PE stimulates the SNS activation, releasing catecholamines (CATs) adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine that play an important regulatory and modulatory actions by affecting metabolic processes and the immune system. Summary of the dispersed literature in this area and explanation of the biological mechanisms operating between PE-CATs and the immune system would lead to a better understanding of the beneficial and negative effects of PE on health. This overview aimed to: demonstrate representative literature findings on the exercise released CATs levels, major functions performed by these hormones, their interactions with immune system and their effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Also, mechanisms of cytotoxic free radicals and reactive oxygen species generation during CATs oxidation, and molecular mechanisms of CATs response to exercise are discussed to demonstrate positive and negative on human health effects. Owi...
Source: Free Radical Research - Category: Research Tags: Free Radic Res Source Type: research

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ke MA Abstract Chronic cancer-related symptoms (stress, fatigue, pain, depression, insomnia) may be linked with sympathetic nervous system over-activation and autonomic imbalance. Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) is an indicator of autonomic dysregulation that is commonly observed among cancer survivors. HRV biofeedback (HRVB) training induces HRV coherence, which maximizes HRV and facilitates autonomic and cardiorespiratory homeostasis. This randomized, wait-list-controlled, pilot intervention trial tested the hypothesis that HRVB can improve HRV coherence and alleviate cancer-related symptoms. The interven...
Source: Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback Source Type: research
AbstractChronic cancer-related symptoms (stress, fatigue, pain, depression, insomnia) may be linked with sympathetic nervous system over-activation and autonomic imbalance. Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) is an indicator of autonomic dysregulation that is commonly observed among cancer survivors. HRV biofeedback (HRVB) training induces HRV coherence, which maximizes HRV and facilitates autonomic and cardiorespiratory homeostasis. This randomized, wait-list-controlled, pilot intervention trial tested the hypothesis that HRVB can improve HRV coherence and alleviate cancer-related symptoms. The intervention group (n &t...
Source: Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare medicine Source Type: news
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: blogs
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Source: Supportive Care in Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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