Cold plasma patch could make immunotherapy more effective for treating melanoma, study finds

This study represents an important milestone for the field of plasma medicine,” said co-senior author Richard Wirz, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UCLA Samueli. “It demonstrates that the microneedle patch can realize the plasma delivery while also working with the drug t o improve the effectiveness of cancer therapy.”“Plasma can generate reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, which are a group of chemical species that can destroy cancer cells,” said Guojun Chen, who is the co-first author of the study and a postdoctoral fellow in Gu’s laboratory.“Those cancers can then release tumor-associated antigens, which can enhance immune response to kill cancers,” said Zhitong Chen, who is the other co-first author and a postdoctoral fellow in Wirz’s lab.The team tested the cold plasma patch on mice with melanoma tumors. The mice that received the treatment showed an increased level of dendritic cells, which are a specific type of white blood cells that alert the immune system of a foreign invader and initiate a T cell-mediated immune response.The group of mice also showed delayed tumor growth compared to the untreated group and 57% were still alive at 60 days, while mice in other control groups had all died.“This treatment strategy can potentially go beyond cancer immunotherapy,” said Gu, who is also a member of the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA. “Integrated with ot...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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This study represents an important milestone for the field of plasma medicine,” said co-senior author Richard Wirz, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UCLA Samueli. “It demonstrates that the microneedle patch can realize the plasma delivery while also working with the drug t o improve the effectiveness of cancer therapy.”“Plasma can generate reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, which are a group of chemical species that can destroy cancer cells,” said Guojun Chen, who is the co-first author of the study and a postdoctoral fellow in Gu’s laboratory.&ldq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Conclusions: Our in silico and experimental analyses suggest that non-small cell lung carcinoma will likely respond to a new generation of anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibodies. Our approach provides an objective ranking of the sensitivity of human cancers to anti-CTLA-4 antibodies. The comprehensive ranking of major cancer types provides a roadmap for clinical development of the next generation of anti-CTLA-4 antibodies.
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
That cancer mortality is declining at a time in which the aged segment of the population is growing, and ever more people are overweight and obese, is a testament to (a) improved prevention (largely fewer people smoking, which has a sizable impact on lung cancer incidence and severity) and (b) the ever increasing efficacy of modern cancer treatments, particularly immunotherapies. These newer cancer therapies are still in the comparatively early stages of evolution as a technology platform, and we should expect these gains to continue. The immunotherapies of the 2030s will be very impressive in comparison to those deployed ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Novel cancer therapies are showing promising results with improved progression free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanoma. Radiomics represents new emerging quantitative methodologies that provide most robust data to support clinical decision in particular when atypical treatment response is present in these patients. The aim of this paper was to review the state of the art of radiomics when it is applied to the imaging of malignant melanoma patients. AbstractAdvanced malignant melanoma represents a public health matter due to its rising incidence and aggressiveness. Novel therapies such as immunotherapy ...
Source: Cancer Medicine - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: REVIEW Source Type: research
n-Anezin Oncogene-induced STAT3-activation is central to tumor progression by promoting cancer cell expression of pro-angiogenic and immunosuppressive factors. STAT3 is also activated in infiltrating immune cells including tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) amplifying immune suppression. Consequently, STAT3 is considered as a target for cancer therapy. However, its interplay with other STAT-family members or transcription factors such as NF-κB has to be considered in light of their concerted regulation of immune-related genes. Here, we discuss new attempts at re-educating immune suppressive tumor-associated m...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
AbstractImmune checkpoint blockers (ICB) have revolutionized cancer therapy. However, complete response is observed in a minority of patients and most patients develop immune-related adverse events (irAEs). These include colitis, which can be treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies such as Infliximab. In a recent issue of the Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, Badran et al. reported that co-administering Infliximab together with ICB to five cancer patients prevents colitis recurrence, with four of them exhibiting overall disease stability. The basis for this treatment strategy stemmed from our pre-clinic...
Source: Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Yicheng Ni Cancer remains a major cause of death globally. Given its relapsing and fatal features, curing cancer seems to be something hardly possible for the majority of patients. In view of the development in cancer therapies, this article summarizes currently available cancer therapeutics and cure potential by cancer type and stage at diagnosis, based on literature and database reviews. Currently common cancer therapeutics include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy. However, treatment with curative intent by these methods are mainly eligible for patients with localized diseas...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
ConclusionICIs have demonstrated the ability to induce improved long-term survival in metastatic cutaneous or mucosal melanomas, including those of gynecologic origin. As ICI therapy becomes more widespread, healthcare providers across all fields of medicine need be vigilant to recognize the symptoms of irAEs that can often masquerade as common illnesses to prevent potentially dangerous irreversible immune toxicities.
Source: Gynecologic Oncology Reports - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Conclusion: FOXC2 drives a tumor-promoting gene expression program in melanoma and is a prognostic indicator of patient response to multiple cancer therapies.
Source: Cancer Genomics and Proteomics - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
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