How to Stop Being a People Pleaser: 7 Powerful Habits

“You wouldn’t worry so much about what others think of you if you realized how seldom they do.” Eleanor Roosevelt “When you say “yes” to others, make sure you aren’t saying “no” to yourself.” Paulo Coehlo When you get stuck in the habit of being a people pleaser then that can have a sneaky and negative effect. Not only on you but also on the people around you. Because as you try to please the other people in your life: You put on a mask and try to guess what to do while getting anxious and stressed. You sometimes feel taken advantage off by others who use your people pleasing habit and you often feel out of tune with what you yourself deep down want. It can also have an unintended effect on other people as they may see through your mask, start to feel your inner discomfort and stress themselves and get confused or upset because they sense you are not being honest and straightforward with them. So trying to please others pretty much all the time is often an even worse choice that one may at first think. But how can you change this behavior and stop being a people pleaser? This week I’d like to share 7 powerful insights and habits that have helped me with that. 1. Realize that with some people it isn’t about you and what you do (no matter what you do). Some people just can’t be pleased. No matter what you do. Because it’s not about what you do or do not do. It’s about him or her. About ...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Happiness Health People Skills Personal Development Relaxation Success Source Type: blogs

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