Innate immunemodulator containing adjuvant formulated HA based vaccine protects mice from lethal infection of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus.

Innate immunemodulator containing adjuvant formulated HA based vaccine protects mice from lethal infection of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus. Vaccine. 2020 Jan 31;: Authors: Lu Y, Landreth S, Liu G, Brownlie R, Gaba A, Littel-van den Hurk SVD, Gerdts V, Zhou Y Abstract The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses and their spillover into the human population pose substantial economic and public health threats. Although antiviral drugs have some effect in treating influenza infection, vaccination is still the most effective intervention to prevent possible pandemic outbreaks. We have developed a novel H5 influenza vaccine to improve the world's pandemic preparedness. We produced a hemagglutinin (HA) of HPAI H5N1 virus A/Alberta/01/2014 (AB14) using both mammalian (m) and bacterial (b) expression systems. The purified recombinant proteins were formulated with a proprietary adjuvant (TriAdj) and their efficacy as vaccine candidates was evaluated in mice. Intramuscular delivery of two doses of TriAdj formulated mammalian expressed HA (m-HA/TriAdj) was shown to provide full protection against a lethal challenge of AB14 in mice. In contrast, bacterially expressed HA with TriAdj (b-HA/TriAdj), b-HA without adjuvant, and m-HA without adjuvant resulted in no protection in immunized mice. Furthermore, m-HA/TriAdj elicited significantly higher levels of balanced Th1 and Th2 responses and neutralizing antibody titres. All the mice in the m...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research

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“Everyone knows that pestilences have a way of recurring in the world,” observes Albert Camus in his novel The Plague. “Yet somehow we find it hard to believe in ones that crash down on our heads from a blue sky. There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet plagues and wars always take people by surprise.” Camus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news
Conclusions: Human challenge studies and systems biology approaches are important tools that should be used in concert to advance our understanding of influenza infection and provide targets for novel therapeutics and immunizations. Introduction Although influenza virus was recognized as an important pathogen over a century ago, influenza continues to cause a significant burden of disease. In the United States alone, it's estimated that in the 2017–2018 season there were 959,000 hospitalizations related to influenza illness, and 79,400 deaths (CDC, 2018). Worldwide, WHO estimates that annual influenza...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Abstract Bird to human transmission of high pathogenicity avian influenza virus (HPAIV) poses a significant risk of triggering a flu pandemic in the human population. Therefore, vaccination of susceptible poultry during an HPAIV outbreak might be the best remedy to prevent such transmissions. To this end, suitable formulations and an effective mass vaccination method that can be translated to field settings needs to be developed. Our previous study in chickens has shown that inhalation of a non-adjuvanted dry powder influenza vaccine formulation during normal breathing results in partial protection against lethal ...
Source: European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Eur J Pharm Biopharm Source Type: research
Abstract The limited protection of current commerical vaccines necessitates the investigation of novel vaccine strategies for unpredictable outbreaks. To investigate the feasibility of using vaccines derived from Group 1 influenza A virus to induce broadly cross-reactive immune responses against multiple influenza subtypes, we tested a panel of sequential 4-dose immunization regimens in mice. Mice were treated with inactivated (seasonal H1N1, pandemic H1N1 and H5N1) and vaccinia virus-based H5N1 live-attenuated vaccines in different combinations. Mice were then challenged by viruses of either Group 1 (H1N1) or Gro...
Source: Virology - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Virology Source Type: research
DAVID E. BLOOM is the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography, DANIEL CADARETTE is a research assistant, and JP SEVILLA is a research associate, all at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.By David E. Bloom, Daniel Cadarette and JP SevillaWASHINGTON DC, Jul 3 2018 (IPS)Infectious diseases and associated mortality have abated, but they remain a significant threat throughout the world.We continue to fight both old pathogens, such as the plague, that have troubled humanity for millennia and new pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), that have mutated or spilled over ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Active Citizens Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
In this study, we attempted to generate a high growth influenza vaccine strain in MDCK cells using an A/Puerto/8/1934 (H1N1) vaccine seed strain. Following 48 serial passages with four rounds of virus plaque purification in MDCK cells, we were able to select several MDCK-adapted plaques that could grow over 108 PFU/ml. Genetic characterization revealed that these viruses mainly had amino acid substitutions in internal genes and exhibited higher polymerase activities. By using of a series of Rg viruses, we demonstrated the essential residues of each gene and identified a set of high-growth strains in MDCK cells (PB1D153N, M...
Source: Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: J Microbiol Biotechnol Source Type: research
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=5919b373e4b0bd90f8e6a746,58e7ca87e4b06f8c18beeb55,58b9d3fde4b05cf0f4008d49 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Editor’s Note: This post reflects on a speech on pandemic preparedness Dr. Fauci gave on January 10, 2017 in Washington, DC, hosted by  The Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University Medical Center, the Harvard Global Health Institute, and Health Affairs. One of the most important challenges facing the new Administration is preparedness for the pandemic outbreak of an infectious disease. Infectious diseases will continue to pose a significant threat to public health and the economies of countries worldwide. The U.S. government will need to continue its investment to combat these ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Global Health Policy Ebola HIV/AIDS NIH pandemic preparedness Zika Source Type: blogs
We report, herein, a paradigm-shift influenza vaccine technology by presenting H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA) to the surface of yeast. We demonstrated, for the first time, that the HA surface-presented yeast can be used as influenza vaccines to elicit both humoral and cell-mediated immunity in mice. The HI titer of antisera reached up to 128 in vaccinated mice. A high level of H5N1 HA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibody production was detected after boost immunization. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the yeast surface-displayed HA preserves its antigenic sites. It preferentially binds to both avian- and human-type receptors. In ad...
Source: Journal of Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: J Immunol Res Source Type: research
The intermittent outbreak of pandemic influenza and emergence of novel avian influenza A virus is worldwide threat. Although most patients present with mild symptoms, some deteriorate to severe pneumonia and even death. Great progress in the understanding of the mechanism of disease pathogenesis and a series of vaccines has been promoted worldwide; however, incidence, morbidity, and mortality remains high. To step up vigilance and improve pandemic preparedness, this article elucidates the virology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, and treatment of human infections by influenza A viruses, with an emphas...
Source: Clinics in Chest Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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