Infertility the second time around

Most anyone who has struggled with secondary infertility knows that it is an incredibly lonely experience. You may be blessed with one or two children — possibly more — but struggling to expand or complete your family. Surrounded by families with young children, you find yourself alone and in pain. If you are a veteran of primary infertility, you may remember strategies you developed for shielding yourself from the pregnancies of others. Not so this second time around: pregnant women and moms with babies and toddlers surround you at preschool. If you had your first child with ease and are new to infertility, you may feel even less equipped to deal with seemingly limitless fecundity. Primary infertility prepared your fellow travelers for the envy, anger, sadness, isolation, and awkwardness it brings. For you these feelings are new, and along with them comes the guilt of secondary infertility: “Why can’t I be happy with the child I have?” Today we’ll focus on ways you can cope with secondary infertility. The first few steps to coping with secondary infertility Seek good medical care. If you went through primary infertility, you know the ropes of the world of reproductive medicine. However, if this is all new to you, do not delay in seeking expert help. There is a lot to learn in reproductive medicine. Beginning to understand it may help you feel that you have some control of your situation. Don’t be reluctant to seek a second and even a...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infertility Men's Health Parenting Relationships Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

Therapists are real people. It might seem funny to say that, but we forget that clinicians struggle, too. They, too, grapple with depression, trauma, guilt, and self-doubt. They, too, stress out over daily tasks and responsibilities. They, too, feel stuck and paralyzed. We asked six therapists to share what frays their nerves, and how they cope when these stressors strike. Overall, we hope you realize that you’re really not alone and there are many healthy strategies you can turn to. Karissa King Therapist Karissa J. King, LMFT, regularly travels with her husband to speak at marriage retreats. They have two children,...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Meditation overwhelm Self Care Therapy Yoga Source Type: blogs
This is a guest post from one of our patients. She is 32 and recently froze her eggs at Malpani Infertility ClinicOur 20 ’s and early 30's may be theeasiest time to have a baby but it's not always the best time - for a lot of good reasons. We are at the top of our career and want to grow professionally; we want to prepare emotionally and financially to be parents ; and we are unwilling to settle for Mr. RightNow instead of Mr. Right.The problem is that the biological clock is ticking on - and we can hear it loud and clear ! The good news is that with a little medical help , we can freeze time , to plan for the future...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
Being born and giving birth is full of pain, blood, and trauma. Many science fiction works, such as Brave New World, Matrix, The Island, or I am Mother imagine being brought to the world without actually being born in a mother’s womb. How far-fetched are these scenarios? Could the appearance of the artificial womb replace human mothers and natural birth in the future? How will we come into this world in 2050? Will we be born? The trauma of being born and giving birth The experience of being born and leaving the nurturing womb of our mother after more or less nine months is painful, bloody, and traumatic. Abrupt...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Medical Science Fiction artificial artificial womb baby birth designer baby Health Healthcare Innovation mother sci-fi scifi society technology uterus Source Type: blogs
In my experience, most people dealing with infertility would say that their longing for a child brings sadness year-round. Still, there are times and seasons when the pain intensifies. This may be in spring or early summer when the world is in bloom, winter coats are off and pregnant bellies are out, when greeting card companies and florists ambush airwaves to promote Mother’s Day and Father’s Day. Similarly, the winter holidays present an ever-lengthening stretch during which many women and men who are struggling with infertility feel pummeled. Bookended by Thanksgiving and New Year’s, this has become a ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infertility Source Type: blogs
I am still not able to cope up with negative pregnancy test. I just wished that the test still comes positive. My good looking embryos do not like to settle in my good looking endometrium lining. I wish that I could know what these beautiful embryos wants more from me? Why all these medicines,efforts, patience, care, precautions and prayers for having a baby is not paying off. What else can we do to fulfill our dream to have a baby ?Crying is also not helping. After getting result, I spent entire day in reading positive ivf stories on internet I know that in this journey nobody get success immediately, every couple have th...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
​BY GREGORY TAYLOR, DO, &FRANK SCHELL, DOA 30-year-old woman presented to the ED complaining of pelvic pain. She said she felt an acute onset of sharp lower right pelvic pain during intercourse two days earlier. The pain continued to worsen, becoming diffuse. She was also experiencing nausea, vomiting, malaise, anorexia, and vaginal spotting. She had no history or concern for sexually transmitted disease, and had no fever or vaginal discharge. She had had a previous Cesarean section and bilateral tubal ligation.Her vital signs were a heart rate of 110 bpm, a respiratory rate of 25 bpm, a blood pressure of 113/88 mm H...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
You couldn’t get pregnant easily, and needed fertility treatments. You had a miscarriage. Or several. You developed complications during your pregnancy. You delivered your baby preterm. Every single one of Parijat Deshpande’s clients feels like their bodies have betrayed them because of the above reasons. Deshpande, MS, is a perinatal mind-body wellness counselor and high-risk pregnancy expert, who helps women navigate stress so they can manage pregnancy complications and give their baby a strong start to life. Psychologist Julie Bindeman, PsyD, works with women struggling with reproductive challenges, depressi...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Women's Issues Betrayal Fertility miscarriage Parenthood Pregnancy Source Type: blogs
When my first period came at age 13, it involved blood clots and extreme pain. I didn’t know what to expect or what was considered “normal,” but thankfully, my mother did. She recognized that my symptoms were unusual and immediately took me to see my pediatrician. I was first prescribed birth control pills, which seemed to help initially, but when my period remained heavy and painful, I was put on a different birth control pill that enabled me to have my period only four times a year. I thought my situation was normal – albeit uncomfortable and inconvenient. No one ever suggested that painful period...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Teen Health endometriosis Marc Laufer Source Type: news
Conclusion The increase in antimicrobial resistance towards drugs used to treat gonorrhoea is reaching a critical stage, especially given how common the infection is worldwide, with an estimated 78 million new cases in 2012. This study raises concerns around an important topic while also proposing strategies to help address the slow pace of research and development of new drugs. The prevention of gonorrhoea is equally, if not more, important. The most effective way to prevent gonorrhoea is to always use a condom during sex, including anal and oral sex. Read more advice about sexually transmitted infections and how to prev...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication QA articles Source Type: news
ConclusionsWomen with AIS experience slightly elevated rates of nulliparity, infertility treatment, prepartum back pain, and peripartum curve progression. However, most women are able to have children and are not at increased risk of pregnancy-related complications. Higher quality evidence is needed to better define these relationships and allow more guided counseling and treatment.
Source: European Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
More News: Babies | Back Pain | Blogging | Children | Harvard | Health | Infertility | Learning | Pain | Parenting | Pregnancy | Reproduction Medicine | Universities & Medical Training | Women