Why This Week Could Be Critical for Understanding How Bad the Coronavirus Outbreak Will Get

It has been less than two months since authorities in the central Chinese city of Wuhan announced they were investigating a mysterious pneumonia-like viral infection. In that time, the pathogen—later identified at novel coronavirus 2019-nCov—has spread around China with abandon—from a few dozen suspected cases to more than 20,000 confirmed infections, causing and more than 420 deaths. But this week could prove crucial for understanding how much farther the outbreak is likely to spread and whether the dramatic efforts of Chinese authorities to contain the coronavirus have been effective. Officials in China began placing entire cities on lockdown in an attempt to stop the spread of the deadly virus on Jan. 23, when outbound trains and flights from Wuhan— the biggest city in Hubei province, population 11 million— were suspended. The next day authorities broadened the lockdown to include 13 cities, and by Jan. 25 the blockade had expanded to 16 surrounding cities with a combined population of more than 50 million, creating what is believed to be the largest quarantine in human history. “This week we should start to see the effects of the containment strategy,” Ben Cowling, a professor of infectious disease epidemiology at the University of Hong Kong, tells TIME. “This week is a critical week.” The virus appears to have an average incubation period of about five days, according to a study published by re...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV China Infectious Disease onetime overnight Source Type: news

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By Lyle Fettig@fettiglyleCheck out the Pallimed COVID-19 Resource page here. - Ed.I love theletter co-published by Pallimed and Geripal about COVID,and you should read that too. As an erstwhile (for now) Pallimed contributor, I thought I'd toss in my two cents with some additional thoughts/reflections based on week 1 of preparing for the COVID pandemic as a palliative care physician.Over the last week, I've operated mentally in most of these lanes:1. Primary prevention and public health:Through extensive advocacy for social distancing and widespread testing. I have talked about it with my patients and my own family and fri...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: covid emergency preparedness fettig Source Type: blogs
Cheryl Man is usually the only one wearing a face mask on her New York City subway train. She notices this, but other people on the train notice, too. Usually she just gets odd stares from other commuters. But on Tuesday morning, when she was walking to school, a group of teens jeered at her and coughed in her direction. “I felt very humiliated and misunderstood,” says Man, a 20-year-old student and research assistant who is ethnically Chinese. Man also feels the stigma at her workplace, where she keeps her mask on. None of her colleagues wear a face mask, and some of them have asked her if she is sick. &ldqu...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 onetime overnight Source Type: news
This article is republished from The Conversation. Read the original article. The post Coronavirus: Ten Reasons Why You Ought Not to Panic appeared first on Inter Press Service. Excerpt: Ignacio López-Goñi is microbiologist and works in University of Navarra (Spain). The post Coronavirus: Ten Reasons Why You Ought Not to Panic appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Coronavirus Source Type: news
Novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a newly discovered contagious disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus, primarily manifesting as an acute respiratory illness with interstitial and alveolar pneumonia, but can affect multiple organs such as kidney, heart, digestive tract, blood and nervous system1. The rapidly spreading outbreak which first emerged in Wuhan, Hubei Province in China in December 2019 has raised concerns about a global pandemic. To date (2 March 2020), 88,948 cases of COVID-19 have been reported worldwide in 65 countries (and a cruise ship) and 79,842 in mainland China, with 3,043 deaths worldwide (mainland China 2,915 deaths).
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
(CNN) — As the novel coronavirus — and panic about the coronavirus — continues to spread around the world, so too are bogus claims, conspiracy theories and misinformation about the disease. There’s so much inaccurate information floating around out there that the World Health Organization is calling it an “infodemic.” In perhaps the clearest sign of the times, WHO has joined TikTok to help set the record straight. Read: Coronavirus – What You Should And Shouldn’t Do The myths exist both on the fringes of the internet and in more mainstream outlets. And while social media...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health CNN Coronavirus Source Type: news
It’s hard enough getting old, what with all of the creeping ailments—diabetes, COPD, dementia, heart disease—that come along with age. Now add a novel coronavirus to the mix. There are more than 91,000 COVID-19 cases and 3,100 deaths as of writing, but the virus doesn’t hit all demographics equally hard—and seniors are the most vulnerable. A late February study in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that children 10 and under accounted for just 1% of all COVID-19 cases, for example, while adults in the 30-79 age groups represented a whopping 87%. The World Health Organizatio...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
It took eight hours for a doctor to see Wu Chen’s mother after she arrived at the hospital. Eight days later, she was dead. The doctor was “99% sure” she had contracted the mysterious pneumonia-like illness sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan, Wu says, but he didn’t have the testing kit to prove it. And despite the 64-year-old’s fever and perilously low oxygen levels, there was no bed for her. Wu tried two more hospitals over the next week, but all were overrun. By Jan. 25, her mother was slumped on the tile floor of an emergency room, gasping for air, drifting in and out of conscious...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV China Source Type: news
Mental health care is urgently needed for patients and health care workers affected by coronavirus, wrote Yu-Tao Xiang, M.D., of the University of Macau in China and colleagues in aneditorial published Tuesday inLancet Psychiatry. The authors suggest that the lessons learned from the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak can guide the mental health response to coronavirus.The outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus pneumonia (2019-nCoV) has garnered international attention and produced a wave of anxiety. Officials in China, where the outbreak originated, and elsewhere have enacted a range of measures to com...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety biological disaster coronavirus depression Lancet Psychiatry mental health SARS suicidality Yu-Tao Xiang Source Type: research
Since the SARS outbreak 18 years ago, a large number of severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronaviruses (SARSr-CoV) have been discovered in their natural reservoir host, bats1 –4. Previous studies indicated that some of those bat SARSr-CoVs have the potential to infect humans5–7. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) which caused an epidemic of acute respiratory syndrome in humans in Wuhan, China. The epidemic, which started from 12 December 2019, has caused 2,050 laboratory-confirmed infections with 56 fatal cases by 26 January 2020. Full-length genom...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 4 February 2020Source: Microbes and InfectionAuthor(s): Jieliang ChenAbstractA zoonotic coronavirus, labeled as 2019-nCoV by The World Health Organization (WHO), has been identified as the causative agent of the viral pneumonia outbreak in Wuhan, China, at the end of 2019. Although 2019-nCoV can cause a severe respiratory illness like SARS and MERS, evidence from clinics suggested that 2019-nCoV is generally less pathogenic than SARS-CoV, and much less than MERS-CoV. The transmissibility of 2019-nCoV is still debated and needs to be further assessed. To avoid the 2019-nCoV outbreak turnin...
Source: Microbes and Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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