Comparative evaluation of fluorescence polarization assay and competitive ELISA for the diagnosis of bovine brucellosis vis-a-vis sero-monitoring

Publication date: Available online 31 January 2020Source: Journal of Microbiological MethodsAuthor(s): Triveni Kalleshamurthy, Somy Skariah, Yashaswini Rathore, Kavana D. Ramanjinappa, Chaitra Nagaraj, Bibek Ranjan Shome, Habibur Rahman, Nagendra Nath Barman, Rajeswari ShomeAbstractBrucellosis is an important zoonosis that constitutes a serious public health hazard which is caused by a bacterium belonging to the genus Brucella. In the present study, two highly specific serological tests for brucellosis diagnosis, fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) and competitive ELISA (cELISA) were standardized in the laboratory, evaluated and compared with rose bengal plate test (RBPT), indirect ELISA (iELISA) and commercial cELISA kit. For test evaluation, 1386 serum samples [apparently healthy animals (n = 260), samples from Brucella infected farms (n = 701) and B. abortus S19 vaccinated animals (n = 425)] were analyzed to assess suitable diagnostic test in B. abortus S19 post vaccinated bovine population. In apparently healthy brucellosis free farms, RBPT, iELISA, in-house FPA and cELISA were found to be more highly specific than commercial cELISA. Commercial cELISA kit was comparatively more sensitive than other serological tests in samples collected from infected farms. The FPA showed sensitivity nearly equal to RBPT and in-house cELISA showed greater sensitivity than RBPT in infected farms. In animals with persistent vaccinal antibodies, only in-house FPA and cELISA rec...
Source: Journal of Microbiological Methods - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research

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AbstractBrucellosis is a neglected zoonosis. It causes acute febrile illness and a potentially debilitating chronic infection in humans, and livestock infection has substantial socioeconomic impact. Over the past two decades, improvements have been made to better understand the various aspects of human and animal brucellosis. Meanwhile, especially in the developing world, immense challenges that remain in controlling and eradicating brucellosis are novel diagnostics tools and efficacious vaccines. Here, we will focus on the remarkable issues on epidemiological survey, as well as the priority and challenge of brucellosis in...
Source: Infectious Diseases of Poverty - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
by Carine Rodrigues Pereira, Jo ão Vitor Fernandes Cotrim de Almeida, Izabela Regina Cardoso de Oliveira, Luciana Faria de Oliveira, Luciano José Pereira, Márcio Gilberto Zangerônimo, Andrey Pereira Lage, Elaine Maria Seles Dorneles Brucellosis is a neglected zoonotic disease of remarkable importance worldwide. The focus of this systematic review was to investigate occupational brucellosis and to identify the main infection risks for each group exposed to the pathogen. Seven databases were used to identify papers related to o ccupational brucellosis: CABI, Cochrane, Pubmed, Scielo, Science Direc...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular bacteria notorious for their ability to induce a chronic, and often lifelong, infection known as brucellosis. To date, no licensed vaccine exists for prevention of human disease, and mechanisms underlying chronic illness and immune evasion remain elusive. We and others have observed that B cell-deficient mice challenged with Brucella display reduced bacterial burden following infection, but the underlying mechanism has not been clearly defined. Here, we show that at 1 month postinfection, B cell deficiency alone enhanced resistance to splenic infection ~100-fold; however, combine...
Source: Infection and Immunity - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Microbial Immunity and Vaccines Source Type: research
Abstract The aim of the research was to evaluate real-time PCR (qPCR) as an alternate method for quantitative detection of Brucella abortus strain 544 (S544) in the spleen of mice for potency testing of live B. abortus strain 19 (S19) vaccine. IS711 and eryC gene-based qPCR were optimized for calculating copy number. The copy number was further correlated with live Brucella count in the spleen by standard plate count (SPC) method. The mice were immunized with S19 and challenged with S544 on 30th Day post-immunization. The spleen of mice was collected at 15th, 21st, and 30th days post challenge (DPC) for estimation...
Source: Animal Biotechnology - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Anim Biotechnol Source Type: research
Conclusions: The study concluded in bringing out the contributing risk factors for brucellosis. The study concluded that treating animal infection on their own and helping animals during reproduction without using protective gear, as major contributing risk for brucellosis. Other factors includes, keeping animals in close proximity during sleep, irregular vaccination, etc.
Source: Indian Journal of Community Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
In this study, the gene encoding OMP19 antigen was primarily amplified and cloned into an expression vector called pT1NX, and then transformed to L. casei cell via electroporation technique. The expression was confirmed using specific antibody against the recombinant protein via immunological screening tests such as western blot and immunofluorescence assay. Finally, recombinant L. casei was orally fed to mice and the results were further recorded, indicating that the mice group which received OMP19 through L. casei based vaccine represented a very good general and mucosal immune responses protective against challenges wit...
Source: Comparative immunology, microbiology and infectious diseases. - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis Source Type: research
ary U, Wensman JJ Abstract An extended range of host susceptibility including camel has been evidenced for some of the important veterinary and public health pathogens, such as brucellosis, peste des petits ruminants (PPR) and bluetongue (BT). However, in disease endemic settings across many parts of the globe, most of the disease control interventions accounts for small and large ruminants, whereas unusual hosts and/or natural reservoirs, such as camels, remain neglected for disease control measures including routine vaccination. Such a policy drawback not only plays an important role in disease epizootiology par...
Source: Acta Tropica - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Acta Trop Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 February 2020Source: Research in Veterinary ScienceAuthor(s): Vinod Ahuja, David Ward, Rukhshona Rajabov, Anni McLeod, Ron JacksonAbstractIn the context of significant public health benefits of brucellosis control and shrinking public resources for livestock vaccination, this paper considers the willingness of small ruminant livestock owners to pay for vaccination of their animals against brucellosis. The willingness to pay is estimated through a binary choice contingent valuation approach using data from a rural household survey specially designed for this purpose. The survey was cond...
Source: Research in Veterinary Science - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
In the original publication of this article [1], the corresponding author points out Pilar M. Mu ñoz and Raquel Conde‑Alvarez contributed equally to this work.
Source: Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
AbstractMore than 70% of zoonotic diseases are wildlife associated putting wildlife professionals at increased risk of occupational exposure. In 2008 and 2018, the Arizona Department of Health Services surveyed Arizona wildlife professionals from multiple agencies to assess the risk of disease exposure, rabies pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) history, personal protective equipment (PPE) use, and zoonoses knowledge. In 2008, a 12-question survey was distributed at a state wildlife professional meeting using an anonymous email link. In 2018, a 20-question survey was distributed using an anonymous email link to wildlife agency...
Source: EcoHealth - Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research
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