Human papillomavirus vaccination and prevention of intraepithelial neoplasia and penile cancer: review article

The objective of the current article is to promote a literature revision of the relationship between the prevention of intraepithelial neoplasms (PeIN) and invasive penile cancer, and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, aiming to enumerate the pros and cons of immunization. Recent findings The immunization against the HPV is sufficiently safe and many countries have incorporated the vaccine to their immunization calendar. Compared with men, the sampling size and the evidence quality of scientific researches among the female population are more robust. Some randomized and nonrandomized studies suggest that vaccination reduces the incidence of genital warts and no PeIN and penile cancer cases were developed in the vaccinal group. However, 70% of patients can evolve with the neoplasia despite having been immunized and even among HPV infected patients, only 1% will develop cancer. Summary The studies about vaccination against HPV and prevention on penile cancer are conflicting and the main academic urology societies still have not incorporated vaccination of men in their guidelines. Future studies are necessary to confirm the efficiency and cost–benefit of the vaccine in men to prevent intraepithelial neoplasms and invasive penile cancer.
Source: Current Opinion in Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: PENIS CANCER: Edited by Oscar R. Brouwer and Daher C. Chade Source Type: research

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Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted virus. The high-risk HPV types (i.e., HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59) are considered to be the main etiological agents of genital tract cancers, such as cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, and anal cancers, and of a subset of head and neck cancers. Three prophylactic HPV vaccines are available that are bivalent (vs. HPV16, 18), tetravalent (vs. HPV6, 11, 16, 18), and non-avalent (vs. HPV6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33,45, 52, 58). All of these vaccines are based on recombinant DNA technology, and they are prepared from the purified L1 protein that s...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
New evidence published in the Cochrane Library today provides further information on the benefits and harms of different human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and vaccine schedules in young women and men.HPV is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract in both women and men globally (WHO 2017). Most people who have sexual contact will be exposed to HPV at some point in their life. In most people, their own immune system will clear the HPV infection.HPV infection can sometimes persist if the immune system does not clear the virus. Persistent infection with some ‘high-risk’ strains of HPV can lead t...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news
Abstract Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes nearly all cervical cancers and some cancers of the vagina, vulva, penis, anus, and oropharynx (1).* Most HPV infections are asymptomatic and clear spontaneously within 1 to 2 years; however, persistent infection with oncogenic HPV types can lead to development of precancer or cancer (2). In the United States, the 9-valent HPV vaccine (9vHPV) is available to protect against oncogenic HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 as well as nononcogenic types 6 and 11 that cause genital warts. CDC analyzed data from the U.S. Cancer Statistics (USCS)† to assess the incide...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
By Jacqueline Howard, CNN (CNN) — The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, known as ACIP, voted unanimously on Wednesday to recommend HPV vaccines for both boys and girls and men and women through age 26. Previously the CDC recommended that teen girls and young women who had not been adequately vaccinated receive the human papillomavirus vaccine through age 26, but the recommendation for teen boys and young men only went through age 21. The CDC’s recommendation that children start receiving two doses of the HPV vaccine around 11 or 12...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN HPV vaccine Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: The results underscored the necessity to develop health education and promotion aimed at improving the knowledge and vaccination practice in immigrants and refugees. PMID: 30420043 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Adults up to age 45 can now be vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV), reducing their chances of getting cervical, oral and other cancers. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced Friday that Gardasil 9, a vaccine that works against nine different types of HPV, is now approved for both men and women between the ages of 27 and 45. Previously, it was approved only for those between the ages of nine and 26, and recommended for all children at age 11 or 12. “Today’s approval represents an important opportunity to help prevent HPV-related diseases and cancers in a broader age range,” Dr. Peter M...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
More teenagers than ever before are getting vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV), according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Federal guidelines now say that all children should start two-dose HPV vaccination at age 11 or 12 to protect against HPV-associated cervical, vaginal, penile, anal and throat cancers. Despite that recommendation, however, HPV vaccination rates have traditionally lagged far below their targets. That’s still true — but the new report does suggest that rates are rising. Between 2016 and 2017, the CDC says, the percentage of teenagers who report...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, with at least half of sexually active people contracting the virus—a leading etiology for genital warts and anal, cervical, laryngeal, penile, vaginal, and vulvar cancers. Research suggests HPV is higher among U.S. military personnel than in U.S. civilian populations and can result in significant morbidity or complications and limit U.S. military’s duties or deployable status. Objectives The aim of the study was to identify determinants of HPV vaccination among U.S. Navy personnel. Methods Participants (N = 233) rec...
Source: Nursing Research - Category: Nursing Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research
AbstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and awareness levels of 18-year-old and older women and men on HPV infection, HPV vaccine, and the potential risk factors in Hatay, Turkey. In our study, it was found that overall 27.0 and 23.2% of the participants reported having heard of HPV infection and HPV vaccine. The rate of participants who had heard of HPV infection and HPV vaccine was higher in women than in men (p 
Source: Journal of Cancer Education - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Did you know certain viruses can cause cancer? Two common examples include hepatitis C (which is linked with liver cancer) and human papilloma virus (HPV, which causes cervical cancer). The discovery of these virus-cancer connections is particularly important, because if a vaccine can prevent these viral infections it may also prevent cancer. And there is preliminary evidence that the HPV vaccine is making this happen. More on that in a moment. What is HPV? HPV is a group of viruses that may cause warts (papillomas) and a variety of cancers, including those involving the throat, rect...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Sexual Conditions Vaccines Source Type: blogs
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