Can Face Masks Prevent Coronavirus? Experts Say That Depends

A new coronavirus outbreak, which originated in the Chinese city of Wuhan and has spread throughout Asia and globally, has prompted people around the world to buy medical face masks in hopes of preventing infection. Retailers in the U.S. and across the Internet are running out of antiviral face masks as the number of confirmed cases of the coronavirus (2019-nCoV) now exceeds 9,700 globally. More than 200 people have died from the virus in China, where the majority of the 2019-nCoV cases have been detected. The World Health Organization declared a global health emergency on Thursday as the outbreak continues to spread. As of Friday morning, the United Kingdom and Russia had both confirmed their first cases of the viral infection. Local government officials in Wuhan have required that people wear face masks when they go out in public places to prevent the spread of infection. Health experts tell TIME that such a move is probably effective in the city, where a person is more likely to come in contact with someone who is infected than in other parts of the world. But in the U.S., where just six cases of the coronavirus have so far been detected, wearing face masks will not be that effective, experts say. That’s largely because, according to public health workers, there is no sustained person-to-person transmission of the new coronavirus in the U.S., making face masks not yet necessary. Read more: Coronavirus Grounds Flights to China From 3 Continents. How Scared Should Tra...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease onetime Source Type: news

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If you have no symptoms of the coronavirus, should you wear a mask? It’s one of the most-asked questions during this pandemic, and until recently, one of the most easily answered—if you follow the guidance of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC’s answer, up until April 3? No. According to its initial guidelines, outside of health care settings, face masks should only be worn by people who are sick or who are caring for someone who is sick (when the person who is sick can’t wear a mask). A mask helps capture some of an ill person’s cough particles that might otherwise s...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Throughout history, infectious diseases represent a major global threat to human life and health, knowing neither geographic nor political borders. In 1918 the “Spanish flu” pandemic, caused by the H1N1 influenza A virus, led to catastrophic consequences with a global mortality toll of more than 50 million people (greater than the two world wars). The impact of this influenza virus was not confined to a single period; to date, three subsequent outbreak s (1957, 1968, and 2009, the last called “Swine flu”) resulted from descendants of the initial virus, which acquired one or more genes through reassortment [1].
Source: International Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Last year, when I visited the town of Beni, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), people did not shake hands. Bottles of disinfectant and buckets of chlorinated water were at the entrance of every business. Misinformation spread across social networks and on news-sites, and treatment centers in the northeastern province of North Kivu were being attacked by armed militias. At the time, Beni was one of the centers of a devastating Ebola outbreak, the second most deadly in world history. According to the World Health Organization, almost 3,500 people were sickened by the virus, and more than 2,000 died, a case fatali...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
With a deadly coronavirus epidemic creeping northward and the nearest hospital 230 miles away, Galen Gilbert, First Chief of Arctic Village, Alaska, knew his 200-person town could not afford to take any chances. A single case of COVID-19 could lead to the virus quickly spreading around the tight-knit community, but anybody who needed hospitalization would likely face an overstretched medevac system. As national infection rates rose, the 32-year-old leader and his village made an agonizing decision: rather than risk a potentially devastating outbreak, Arctic Village cut itself off almost entirely from the outside world. &ld...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news
We live in unprecedented modern times experiencing how an outbreak of a particular viral disease, COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, also commonly referred to as the Coronavirus, is disrupting societies and personal lives. The virus is likely to spread to most, if not all, countries, illustrating the interconnectedness of the world. At the time of writing, Italy and Spain have become the epicenters in terms of fatalities in Europe, whereas the United States has recorded the most diagnosed cases worldwide. While many national measures to contain, suppress, mitigate, or delay the spread of the virus are being taken, there is gr...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
The recent WHO decision to declare the novel coronavirus outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), while both appropriate and hardly surprising, offers the opportunity to reflect on the previous PHEIC which was declared, namely the Ebola epidemic in Kivu region, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). And you should really say the ongoing Ebola epidemic, as during the time since the declaration in July 2019 through to the present day (March 2020), a total of 3,453 cases have been reported [1]. The nCoV-2019 outbreak is still ballooning; as of today, over 400,000 confirmed cases worldwide with no ...
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Outbreaks Source Type: blogs
One of the best articles I have come across lately regarding COVID-19 with a strong scientific orientation is: Why the Coronavirus Has Been So Successful. I have personally been wondering whether our upcoming warmer weather will ameliorate the effects of the pandemic as we have seen with our yearly influenza outbreaks. Here is the answer to this question extracted from this Atlantic article:Coronaviruses, much like influenza, tend to be winter viruses.In cold and dry air, the thin layers of liquid that coat our lungs and airways become even thinner, and the beating hairs that rest in those layers struggle to evict vir...
Source: Lab Soft News - Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: blogs
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Mar 19 2020 (IPS) The human factor is intimately involved in the origin, spread, and mitigation of the Coronavirus and we cannot afford to ignore that our future existence depends on compassion and cooperation. Response matters! Some quarantined Italians might recall Giovanni Boccaccio´s The Decameron from 1353 in which people escaping the plague are secluded in a villa where they tell stories to each other. Boccaccio introduced his collection of short stories with an eyewitness account of horrifying human suffering in Florence, which in 1348 was struck by a ”pestilence” t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post COVID-19 in Africa: Fewer Cases So Far, and More Preparation Needed appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Headlines Health Coronavirus Source Type: news
A Novel Coronavirus Pandemic The new coronavirus outbreak, COVID-19, reminds us how we have struggled to keep ahead of mutating pathogens through the ages. The mortality rate for COVID-19 infections appears to be 1–3%, somewhere between the 2009 H1N1 influenza outbreak (0.02%) and the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) epidemic (15%).1 With the... [Read More]
Source: The Rheumatologist - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Conditions COVID-19 Source Type: research
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