Ultrasound followed by CT effective for appendicitis

Ultrasound scans followed by CT if necessary may be the most cost-effective...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI faster, cheaper than ultrasound for appendicitis Adult hospitals overuse CT for appendicitis in kids MRI should be 1st choice for pediatric appendicitis MRI matches CT for appendicitis -- and without radiation US, CT, MRI offer options for diagnosing appendicitis
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news

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Conclusions While the BMI cutoff standard of less than 25 kg/m2 for usefulness of appendix US holds in the adult population, our data expand the acceptable range in children younger than 9 years regardless of BMI and male children with BMI up to 30 kg/m2. Female children younger than 15 years with a BMI up to 30 kg/m2 may also be amenable to right lower quadrant US based on AWT. These parameters inform selective and efficient use of US for appendix evaluation.
Source: Pediatric Emergency Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Abstract Point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) is performed by a physician at the bedside and is standard practice in obstetric, emergency, and musculoskeletal medicine. When compared with formal sonography, POCUS is equivalent in screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm and as accurate in diagnosing deep venous thrombosis. POCUS has high accuracy for diagnosing pneumonia and detecting acute decompensated heart failure but is less accurate than computed tomography for identifying pulmonary embolism. POCUS confirmation of intrauterine pregnancy rules out an ectopic pregnancy. In the third trimester of high-risk preg...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
ConclusionThe importance of POCUS in scanning right iliac fossa for patients present with signs and symptoms that are mimicking acute appendicitis for diagnosing a rare pathology and avoiding the risk of ionizing radiation hazards and unnecessary surgical intervention.
Source: Critical Ultrasound Journal - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The strategy of repeating limited focused US followed by CT scan in cases that remain inconclusive has good diagnostic accuracy and reasonable NAR and decreases the number of CT scans. PMID: 31913249 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Pain Physician - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Pediatr Emerg Care Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundTo determine if an inherent perception skill along with sonographer experience, knowledge base, scanning time play a role in the identification of the normal appendix in the pediatric population. This is a retrospective review of pediatric (
Source: Critical Ultrasound Journal - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
(Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2019;59:45–53) The most common emergency nonobstetric abdominal surgery performed in parturients is appendicectomy, which occurs in ∼0.3% of pregnancies. Establishing the diagnosis of appendicitis is more challenging in pregnant women as a result of the physiological changes of pregnancy and the many non-specific symptoms experienced during normal pregnancy. In addition, the use of ultrasound to make the diagnosis is less effective due to the presence of the gravid uterus and computed tomography scanning is sometimes avoided to prevent fetal radiation exposure. Appendiceal perforatio...
Source: Obstetric Anesthesia Digest - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Epidemiologic Reports Surveys Source Type: research
Children with suspected appendicitis generally undergo an ultrasound (most commonly) or a CT scan (rarely) as the first imaging study. At our hospital, patients with non-diagnostic ultrasound or CT scan results undergo a non-contrast (unenhanced), non-sedated MRI. We aimed to determine the accuracy of this study for this purpose in a large cohort of children.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
The purpose of this study is to review the cases of postcolonoscopy appendicitis (PCA) reported in the literature. A comprehensive search using PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, and Google Scholar identified 57 cases. The median age at presentations of PCA was 55 years. PCAs typically occurred during the first 24 hours after colonoscopy, and the majority developed after diagnostic colonoscopy. Clinical presentations were similar to those with common acute appendicitis, though with a high perforation rate. Most patients were correctly diagnosed using ultrasound or computed tomography scan. Treatment included open appendicectomy, lapa...
Source: Surgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy and Percutaneous Techniques - Category: Surgery Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
Conclusion: Macroscopic identification intraoperatively is inaccurate with a FN rate of 22%.
Source: Surgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy and Percutaneous Techniques - Category: Surgery Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
This article originally appeared on Medium here.
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Technology Medical Practice Physicians AI Alex Logsdon Artificial intelligence Radiology Source Type: blogs
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