The Contour —Early Human Experience of a Novel Aneurysm Occlusion Device

ConclusionThe Contour is a  promising new aneurysm occlusion device. Further studies with longer term follow-up are required to determine the efficacy of this novel device.
Source: Clinical Neuroradiology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research

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ConclusionImaging of thrombus can be used as an aseessment tool to predict the outcomes and it needs further studies in the future.
Source: Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Semin Neurol DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1702942Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinical–radiologic diagnosis that affects children and adolescents, but it is much more frequently reported in adults. Clinically, patients present with severe and commonly recurrent thunderclap headaches. Typical precipitating triggers include vasoactive substances, serotonergic agents, and the postpartum period. There may be associated neurologic complications at presentation or in the weeks following, such as convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage, stroke, cerebral edema, cervical artery dissection (CeAD), and seizures. A...
Source: Seminars in Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report in which an immediate thrombus formation on the carotid web was observed in a patient with congenital protein C deficiency. In a case of acute ischemic stroke with carotid web, especially when congenital coagulopathy such as protein C deficiency is suspected, careful follow-up with ultrasound imaging should be performed.
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundAtrial myxoma remains a rare clinical entity with an incidence of surgically resected cases of 0.5 –0.7 per million population and prevalence of
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Unenhanced CT is a mainstay of acute phase imaging due to its availability and, sensitivity and specificity for detecting acute haemorrhage. Several imaging features can be identified on CT and, along with clinical information, can provide some certainty in diagnosis. For those suitable and where diagnostic uncertainty remains CT angiogram, time-resolved CT angiography and catheter angiography can help identify underlying AVMs, aneurysms, cavernomas and vasculitides. MRI is more sensitive for the detection of subacute and chronic haemorrhage and identification of underlying mass lesions. PMID: 32008532 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Current Medical Imaging Reviews - Category: Radiology Tags: Curr Med Imaging Rev Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Acute ischemic stroke with large-vessel occlusion due to calcified emboli is a rare entity in patients undergoing thrombectomy, with considerably worse angiographic outcome and a higher mortality compared with patients with noncalcified thrombi. Good functional recovery at 3 months can still be achieved in about a quarter of patients. PMID: 32029470 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Nuklearmedizin - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: AJNR Am J Neuroradiol Source Type: research
Authors: Rossi UG, Ierardi AM, Cariati M Abstract A 77-year-old woman with a history of hypertension developed acute onset of aphasia and right hemiplegia and hemisensory loss. She was urgently referred to emergency department. Cerebral multidetector computed tomographic angiography (MD-CTA) revealed an acute ischemic stroke due to the occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (Figure 1). Since the symptoms started three hours previously, the patient was candidate for mechanical thrombectomy. The patient then performed a selective digital subtraction angiography (DSA) of the left internal carotid artery that con...
Source: Acta Neurologica Taiwanica - Category: Neurology Tags: Acta Neurol Taiwan Source Type: research
ConclusionFast T2*W sequences demonstrated very good diagnostic performance and inter-reader agreement for detecting SVS in the M1 segment in patients with acute ischemic stroke.
Source: Emergency Radiology - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
An elderly woman with h/o stroke and aphasia seemed different to her daughter, and was pointing all over her body as if in pain.They called 911.She had a history of PCI to the circumflex and also of severe mitral regurgitation, status post bioprosthetic valve replacement.  Also a h/o LV aneurysm with thrombus, on anticoagulation, as well as a dual chamber pacemaker. On arrival, the BP was 60/30.Here is the initial ECG:There is atrial pacing and Right Bundle Branch Block (RBBB)There is STE in I and aVL, V5, V6, with reciprocal STD in II, III, aVFThere is appropriately discordant ST depression in V1-V3 (appropriate...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
A 57-year-old man with atherosclerosis obliterans was admitted with sudden-onset sensory aphasia and right hemiparesis. Brain MRI revealed acute cerebral infarctions in the left temporal lobe and magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the posterior branch of the left middle cerebral artery. Transesophageal echocardiography and ultrasonography respectively confirmed a patent foramen ovale and deep vein thrombosis in the bilateral femoral veins. Blood findings showed low protein S antigen, low protein S activity, and a missense mutation of the PROS 1 gene.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
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