Barriers to overseas recruitment will disrupt care, says UNISON

Commenting on the report from the Migration Advisory Committee published today (Tuesday) on the UK’s future immigration system, UNISON assistant general secretary Christina McAnea said: “The immigration system has got to work for social care. But reducing the salary threshold by £4,400 won’t allow a single care worker to come to the UK. “The sector is already in crisis. Placing barriers to recruitment from overseas would cause it huge difficulties. “Nor would the government’s idea of a one-year visa be any better. By the time care staff have arrived and settled into their jobs, it’d be time for them to leave. “All their experience and training would be lost, and migrant workers would face uncertainty and instability. The elderly and vulnerable people they support would also be left anxious and have their care disrupted. “The government can no longer duck its responsibility to reform social care. If wages were increased and training improved, people who already live and work in the UK might start to see care as an attractive career option.” Notes to editors – UNISON is the UK’s largest union, with more than 1.3 million members providing public services – in education, local government, the NHS, police service and energy. They are employed in both the public and private sectors. Media contacts: Anthony Barnes T: 0207 121 5255  M: 07834 864794 E: a.bar...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: News Press release immigration one-year visa recruitment social care Source Type: news

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