Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of ESBL-Producing and Non-ESBL-Producing Klebsiella Pneumoniae Clinical Isolates

Publication date: Available online 25 January 2020Source: Microbiological ResearchAuthor(s): Shymaa Enany, Samira Zakeer, Ahmed A. SayedAbstractKlebsiella pneumoniae is a pathogenic bacterium that is responsible for a wide range of infections in humans. An increased rate of infections caused by multi-drug-resistant K. pneumoniae has been noted in the last two decades. The association between antimicrobial resistance and virulence is an important topic of study. Genomic tools have been used widely for the detection of virulence. In our study, we used proteomic analysis with mass spectrometry and bioinformatics tools to explore the virulence factors of both ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and to determine the association between virulence and antimicrobial resistance in these clinical isolates. We have revealed different proteomic profiles and different pathways between the ESBL- and non-ESBL-producing groups. Many proteins involved in stress responses have been reported in the shared proteome between ESBL-and non-ESBL producers, such as ElaB protein, Lon protease, and universal stress proteins G and A. The virulence and pathogenicity of ESBL-producing bacteria were stronger than those of the non-ESBL-producing bacteria. Several unique virulence determinants were identified in ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, such as proteins with lyase, catalase, isochorismatase, and oxidoreductase activity.
Source: Microbiological Research - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: Prevalence of antibiotic use was high not only versus other hospitals in the region but globally including Africa, coupled with significant evidence of sub-optimal prescribing. Swift action is needed to improve future prescribing to reduce AMR. One or two areas should initially be targeted for quality improvement including development of local guidelines, documentation of antibiotic indications and/or stop/review dates. PMID: 33034234 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial ResistanceAuthor(s): Elma L. Leite, Wydemberg J. Araújo, Tatiana R. Vieira, Karoline S. Zenato, Priscylla C. Vasconcelos, Samuel Cibulski, Patricia E.N. Givisiez, Marisa R.I. Cardoso, Celso J.B. Oliveira
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 8 October 2020Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial ResistanceAuthor(s): E.L. Looman, P. van Tienen, D.Y.K. Ng, S. Baig, A. Fait, S. Overballe-Petersen, P.S. Andersen, M. Stegger
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Food ControlAuthor(s): John Jorgensen, Rebecca Bland, Joy Waite-Cusic, Jovana Kovacevic
Source: Food Control - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Single cell microorganisms including pathogens relentlessly face myriads of physicochemical stresses in their living environment. In order to survive and multiply under such unfavorable conditions, microbes have evolved with complex genetic networks, which allow them to sense and respond against these stresses. Stringent response is one such adaptive mechanism where bacteria can survive under nutrient starvation and other related stresses. The effector molecules for the stringent response are guanosine-5'-triphosphate 3'-diphosphate (pppGpp) and guanosine-3', 5'-bis(diphosphate) (ppGpp), together called (p)ppGpp. These eff...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Y. Ding et al.
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
COVID-19 has rapidly and radically changed the face of human health and social interaction. As was the case with COVID-19, the world is similarly unprepared to respond to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and the...
Source: Globalization and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
This study descri...
Source: BMC Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2020Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance, Volume 23Author(s): Michael S.M. Brouwer, Richard N. Goodman, Arie Kant, Dik Mevius, Enas Newire, Adam P. Roberts, Kees T. Veldman
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: At present, the prevalence of linezolid resistance has become increasingly serious. The resistance gene optrA has been reported in Enterococcus, Staphylococcus squirrel and Streptococcus, which indicates that this gene has a strong ability to spread across bacteria, so the prevalence and spread of optrA gene should be monitored carefully. PMID: 33015768 [PubMed - in process]
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
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