My Heart Will Go On: Analyzing the Heartbeat Project as a Tool in Palliative and Bereavement Care (FR474)

The heartbeat project is a specialized form of legacy building for patients and families utilizing innovative technology in which the heartbeat of a patient, adult or neonate is recorded with a Bluetooth stethoscope and blended with a song that the patient and/or family indicates is meaningful. This innovative form of integrative and complementary therapy utilizes a board-certified music therapist who guides the patient and/or family through the therapeutic process of choosing the song(s) for this project.
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: Interventions commonly recommended by guidelines are not always supported by a robust evidence base. Research is required to evaluate the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-convulsants, anti-depressants, corticosteroids, some invasive anaesthetic techniques, complementary therapies and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. PMID: 31980005 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Palliative Medicine - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tags: Palliat Med Source Type: research
This study was a quasi-experimental research with a pretest posttest control group designed to investigate the effect of Dharma Creative Art Therapy Program on the quality of life among cancer patients receiving palliative care. The participants included female and male cancer patients receiving palliative care at Arokayasal Kampramong Temple (AKT), Sakon Nakhon Province, Thailand. It is a hospice care center that uses Thai traditional medicine and complementary medicine. Eighteen participants were in the control group and 15 participants in the experimental group.
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research
According to the WHO, Complementary and Alternative Medicine is, ‘a comprehensive term used to refer both to traditional medical systems such as traditional Chinese medicine, Indian Ayurveda and Arabic Unani medicine, and to various forms of indigenous medicine.’
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research
Mucositis is a systemic inflammatory process which may affect the oral cavity to the anus due to antineoplastic therapies. The low level laser therapy (LLLT) has significant therapeutic properties, such as anti-inflamatory and analgesic effects in addition to modulation of celullar activity, which improve clinical response of mucositis.
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research
Patients undergoing treatment for cancer often experience stress, fatigue, and pain during their treatment. Medical management of these symptoms can cause additional adverse effects, but it is possible that noninvasive complementary therapies may be able to reduce these symptoms without unwanted adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and impact of the Seva Stress Release acupressure protocol on stress, fatigue, pain, and vital signs of patients hospitalized for cancer treatment. Thirty patients receiving cancer treatment and experiencing stress, fatigue, and pain were recruited for the stu...
Source: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Symptom Management Series Source Type: research
The aim of palliative care is to improve quality of life for patients with serious illnesses by treating their symptoms and adverse effects. Hospice care also aims for this for patients with a life expectancy of six months or less. When conventional therapies do not provide adequate symptom management or produce their own adverse effects, patients, families and caregivers may prefer complementary or alternative approaches in their care.
Source: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2018Source: European Journal of Integrative Medicine, Volume 21Author(s): Neil Browne, Philippa Bush, Fernando CaboAbstractIntroductionThe study investigated the effectiveness of Shiatsu therapy in relation to the management of health and wellbeing concerns of cancer and palliative care patients in an out-patient clinic.MethodPatients are referred to the Complementary Therapies Service for symptom management, particularly stress and anxiety, but also other symptoms such as nausea or insomnia. Data was collected following use of the Measure Yourself Concerns and Wellbeing (MYCaW) questionnaire, whic...
Source: European Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusion Anxiety, stress management and pain scores were the most improved. Wellbeing scores also improved, on average, by two points on the Likert scale. Patients have stated that ‘being listened to’ and ‘being heard’ were important factors when describing how Shiatsu had helped. We suggest that a study using larger numbers is necessary in order to provide more robust evidence rather than emerging trends.
Source: European Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Aanchal Satija, Sushma BhatnagarIndian Journal of Palliative Care 2017 23(4):468-479Cancer patients are often poly-symptomatic which distressingly affects their quality of lives (QOLs). Alhough, conventional management provides adequate symptom control, yet is coupled with some limitations. Complementary therapies (CTs) have shown beneficial effects in cancer patients for symptomatic relief. The aim of this article is to provide evidence-based review of commonly used CTs for symptom management in cancer care. Hypnosis has promising evidence to be used for managing symptoms such as pain, chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting...
Source: Indian Journal of Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 4 July 2017 Source:International Review of Neurobiology Author(s): Nataliya Titova, K Ray Chaudhuri Nonmotor symptoms (NMS) of Parkinson's disease (PD) are integral to the condition largely regarded as a motor syndrome. A range of NMS underpin the prodromal stage of Parkinson's and are present with variable frequency, range, and nature across the whole journey of a patient with Parkinson's from the onset of the motor disease to palliative stage. These symptoms also are key determinants of quality of life of the patient as well as the carer. Despite this, recognition management and focuse...
Source: International Review of Neurobiology - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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