How the new coronavirus differs from SARS, measles and Ebola

Global health officials say they still do not fully understand the virus’s severity or how readily it is transmitted.
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 1 June 2020Source: Brain, Behavior, and ImmunityAuthor(s): Tong Sun, Junwen Guan, Chao You
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Health officials are raising concerns that the protests sweeping the country could increase the risks of spreading the coronavirus. If cases suddenly spike, city reopenings could be delayed. Mireya Villarreal reports.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
There has been no shortage of innovation and collaboration across the industry to provide critical medical solutions in response to the coronavirus pandemic, but developing a much-needed device is only half the battle. To truly make an impact, innovators need to make their technology available to as many patients as possible. With that end-goal in mind, some organizations are open-sourcing their designs in an effort to ramp up production and distribution. The latest example of this trend comes out of the University of Minnesota (UMN) Bakken Medical Device Center. In early April, MD+DI reported that ...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Contract Manufacturing Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 1 June 2020Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Derek K Chu, Elie A Akl, Stephanie Duda, Karla Solo, Sally Yaacoub, Holger J Schünemann, Derek K Chu, Elie A Akl, Amena El-harakeh, Antonio Bognanni, Tamara Lotfi, Mark Loeb, Anisa Hajizadeh, Anna Bak, Ariel Izcovich, Carlos A Cuello-Garcia, Chen Chen, David J Harris, Ewa Borowiack, Fatimah Chamseddine
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
India's coronavirus infections crossed 200,000, official figures showed on Wednesday, and a peak could still be weeks away in the world's second-most populous country, where the economy has begun re-opening after a lockdown imposed in March .
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
A young boy in Pakistan receives an oral polio vaccine (OPV). Credit: Ashfaq Yusufzai/IPSBy Laura MackenzieMay 6 2020 (IPS) Interruptions to vaccination programmes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic could result in new waves of measles or polio outbreaks, health experts warn. A growing number of one-off immunisation campaigns and national routine vaccine introductions are being delayed amid social distancing and other measures to curb the spread of SARS-CoV-2, leaving millions unprotected. With both preventive campaigns and routine immunisations impacted, “we’ll have an increasing number of children who will becom...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
ettil Viral outbreaks of varying frequencies and severities have caused panic and havoc across the globe throughout history. Influenza, small pox, measles, and yellow fever reverberated for centuries, causing huge burden for economies. The twenty-first century witnessed the most pathogenic and contagious virus outbreaks of zoonotic origin including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Ebola virus, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and Nipah virus. Nipah is considered one of the world’s deadliest viruses with the heaviest mortality rates in some instances. It is known...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
TTP, a technology company based in Melbourn, UK, is developing a handheld PCR (polymerase chain reaction) diagnostic device that can rapidly detect influenza viruses, and one day other viruses, in samples of nasal mucus. The company claims that the s...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Public Health Source Type: blogs
By Margarite Nathe, Principal Editor/Writer, IntraHealth International Midwives and nurses —like Sellyvine (left) at the women's hospital in Nakuru, Kenya —make up 50% of the health workforce worldwide. They're in the spotlight during 2020 and will play a crucial role in whether their countries can achieve their most ambitious health targets by 2030. Photo by Georgina Goodwin for IntraHealth International.February 14, 2020Every year, we look at the top global health issues coming our way in the next 12 months. But global health is a long game and it’s a brand-new decade, so this year, we’re look...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Family Planning & Reproductive Health HIV AIDS Infectious Diseases Maternal, Newborn, Child Health Mental Health Noncommunicable Diseases Digital Health Policy Advocacy Gender Equality Nursing Midwifery Youth Midwives N Source Type: news
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