Knee Arthroscopy: The “Crevice Sign,” a New Pathognomonic Sign for Unstable Posterior Medial Meniscal Tear in Anterior Cruciate Ligament–Deficient Knees

We describe an arthroscopic sign of an unstable medial meniscal tear that is diagnostic. The “crevice sign” is a longitudinal fissure located on the distal medial femoral condyle. In the anterior cruciate ligament–deficient knee, there is increased strain on the medial meniscus. A posterior longitudinal medial meniscal tear can occur at the time of the index injury or with subsequent instability events. During this injury, the knee pivots and the anterior edge of the unstable medial meniscus digs into the articular cartilage of the medial femoral condyle, resulting in a longitudinal split of the distal femoral condyle articular cartilage. If this sign is observed during arthroscopy, it is recommended that surgeons thoroughly probe the medial meniscus to ensure no pathology is missed.
Source: Arthroscopy Techniques - Category: Surgery Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 17 February 2020Source: Arthroscopy TechniquesAuthor(s): Harmen D. Vermeijden, Jelle P. van der List, Gregory S. DiFeliceAbstractRecently, there has been a resurgence of interest in ligament preservation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that has the advantage of preserving the native tissue and maintaining proprioceptive function. Studies reporting outcomes of remnant-preserving ACL surgery have shown encouraging results with a higher potential for early healing and better functional outcomes compared with remnant-resecting surgery. Over the past decade, several surgical techniques...
Source: Arthroscopy Techniques - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 17 February 2020Source: Arthroscopy TechniquesAuthor(s): Jeung Yeol Jeong, Yon-Sik Yoo, Taesoung KimAbstractArthroscopic Bankart repair of anterior instability has shown relatively good results, but its effectiveness is unclear in cases wherein there is a bone defect in the glenoid bone. The surgical management of recurrent anterior shoulder instability with severe glenoid bone loss has been challenging until now. Therefore the Latarjet procedure was introduced as an alternative that provided good results in cases of full instability with a bone defect. In cases of recurrent anterior shou...
Source: Arthroscopy Techniques - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) for different patient outcome scores have been reported for various shoulder diseases, including shoulder arthroplasty and the nonoperative treatment of rotator cuff disease. The purpose of this study was to assess the MCID for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment Form (ASES) score, the Simple Shoulder Test (SST), and a visual analog scale (VAS) measuring pain, after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.
Source: Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeThe autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis technique is described, and the results of a 6-year follow-up clinical study using this technique are presented.Methods30 patients with International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Grade III/IVa symptomatic chondral defects of the knee treated with enhanced microdrilling using atelocollagen were prospectively examined in this clinical series. The median age of the patients was 39.0  years (range 19–61 years). Patients were followed up to 72 months. Clinical evaluation was performed using functional knee scores and radiologically. Both quant...
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: Arthroscopy TechniquesAuthor(s): Graeme P. WhyteAbstractMassive and retracted tears of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons of the rotator cuff are associated with great pain and disability and may be considered “non-repairable,” depending on the extent of injury and the experience of the treating clinician. The technique of anatomic vector repair of the rotator cuff is a surgical treatment method that enables the surgeon to accurately characterize the injury pattern and successfully repair many of these debilitating injuries anatomically in a st...
Source: Arthroscopy Techniques - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The D-WORC is a valid, reliable and responsive questionnaire that can be used in Danish populations. FUNDING: Lone Dragnes Brix: Familien Hede Nielsens Fond, Gurli og Hans Engell Friis' Fond, Aase og Ejnar Danielsens Fond, Knud og Edith Eriksons Mindefond, Region Midtjyllands Sundhedsvidenskabelige Forskningsfond. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Danish Data Protection Agency: 1-16-02-653-15. PMID: 32053484 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Danish Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Dan Med J Source Type: research
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Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
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Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
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Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
This study included 226 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of anterosuperior rotator cuff tears (n = 107, group A) and rotator cuff tears with subscapularis involvement (n = 119, group B). The visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, subjective shoulder value (SSV), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder score, and active range of motion (ROM) were assessed. Modified belly press test was performed t o assess the strength of the subscapularis muscle. Cuff integrity was evaluated using magnetic resonance arthrography or compu...
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
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