Audio-recording of Consent for Anaesthesia for Elective Caesarean Section

Conditions:   Caesarean Section;   Anesthesia Intervention:   Other: Audio-recording of consent for anaesthesia for elective caesarean section Sponsor:   Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials

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PMID: 32068587 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
PMID: 32068586 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
PMID: 32068585 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
PMID: 32068584 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
PMID: 32068583 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
PMID: 32068590 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
BW PMID: 32068589 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
PMID: 32068588 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
ConclusionsImplantation of spinal cord stimulation electrodes through a surgical laminectomy using dexmedetomidine is a safe and feasible procedure with adequate comfort for patient and surgeon. This way of working increases the optimal position of the electrode resulting in the most convenient stimulation pattern and avoiding revisions.
Source: Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Case Series Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: Pharmacology Biochemistry and BehaviorAuthor(s): Aaron Ettenberg, Kathy Ayala, Jacob T. Krug, Lisette Collins, Matthew S. Mayes, Matthew P.A. FisherAbstractSub-anesthetic doses of ketamine produce an increase in rodent ambulation that is attenuated by co-administration of naturally-occurring lithium (LiN), the drug most commonly employed in the treatment of bipolar illness. As a consequence, ketamine-induced hyperactivity has been proposed as an animal model of manic behavior. The current study employed a modified version of this model to compare the potency of LiN...
Source: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
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