Universal screening versus risk-based protocols for antibiotic prophylaxis during childbirth to prevent early-onset Group B streptococcal disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Early-onset group B streptococcal (EOGBS) disease (including sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia) causes significant morbidity and mortality in newborn infants worldwide. Antibiotic prophylaxis can prevent vertical streptococcal transmission, yet no uniform criteria to identify eligible women for prophylaxis exist. Some guidelines recommend universal GBS screening to pregnant women in their third trimester (screening-based protocol), while others employ risk-based protocols. We compare the effectiveness of screening-based vs risk-based protocols in preventing EOGBS disease. Screening-based protocols were associated with lower incidences of EOGBS disease compared to risk-based protocols, while not clearly overexposing women to antibiotics. This information is of relevance for future policymaking.
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

Abstract Primary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is caused by inhaling airborne spores of the fungus Coccidioides immitis or Coccidioides posadasii. Residing in or traveling to areas endemic for Coccidioides is required for the diagnosis; no person-to-person or zoonotic contagion occurs. The incidence of coccidioidomycosis is increasing in endemic areas, and it has been identified as the cause of as many as 17% to 29% of all cases of community-acquired pneumonia in some regions. Obtaining a travel history is recommended when evaluating patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Diagnosis usually relie...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Screening-based protocols were associated with lower incidences of EOGBS disease compared to risk-based protocols, while not clearly overexposing women to antibiotics. This information is of relevance for future policymaking. PMID: 31913562 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: BJOG : An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: BJOG Source Type: research
Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major opportunistic pathogen in certain adult populations, including pregnant women, and remains a leading etiologic agent of newborn disease. During pregnancy, GBS asymptomatically colonizes the vaginal tract of 20-30% of healthy women, but can be transmitted to the neonate in utero or during birth resulting in neonatal pneumonia, sepsis, meningitis, and subsequently 10-15% mortality regardless of antibiotic treatment. While various GBS virulence factors have been implicated in vaginal colonization and invasive disease, the regulation of many of these factors remains unclear. Recently, CRI...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Discussion Facial nerve palsy has been known for centuries, but in 1821 unilateral facial nerve paralysis was described by Sir Charles Bell. Bell’s palsy (BP) is a unilateral, acute facial paralysis that is clinically diagnosed after other etiologies have been excluded by appropriate history, physical examination and/or laboratory testing or imaging. Symptoms include abnormal movement of facial nerve. It can be associated with changes in facial sensation, hearing, taste or excessive tearing. The right and left sides are equally affected but bilateral BP is rare (0.3%). Paralysis can be complete or incomplete at prese...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Colonization of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of pregnant women with group B Streptococcus (GBS) can result in vertical transmission to neonates during labor/delivery. GBS infections in neonates can cause severe complications, such as sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia. Accurate detection is critical because administration of intrapartum antibiotics can significantly reduce transmission. We compared the clinical sensitivities of three nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs), the Hologic Panther Fusion GBS, Luminex Aries GBS, and Cepheid Xpert GBS LB assays, to that of the standard of care culture method rec...
Source: Journal of Clinical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Bacteriology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: This is the first cohort study to assess GBS colonization in Western Australian pregnant women and will be highly beneficial for guiding clinical practice and future therapeutic options, in particular, the selection of suitable vaccine candidates. PMID: 31013212 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
In this study they also showed PTX3 localized in NETs formed after neutrophil activation (5). Proteomics analysis revealed that PTX3 forms complexes with two anti-microbial proteins [azurocidin (AZU1) and myeloperoxidase (MPO)] associated to NETs (30). More recently, PTX3 localization in NETs has been confirmed, and the colocalization with AZU1 and MPO has been defined more accurately (31). Further investigation will be needed to understand the involvement of PTX3 interaction with AZU1 and MPO in their antibacterial role during NET formation. Regulation of Complement Activation PTX3 interaction with microorganisms is not...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
by Joyce Marinho de Souza, Rog ério Giuffrida, Ana Paula Marques Ramos, Glilciane Morceli, Camila H. Coelho, Marcus Vinícius Pimenta Rodrigues Syphilis is a Sexually Transmitted Infection (IST) with significant importance to public health, due to its impact during pregnancy (Gestational Syphilis—GS); especially because syphilis can affect fetus and neonates’ development (mother-to-child transmission—MTCT of syphilis), by increasing susceptibility to abortion, premature birth, skeletal malformations, meningitis and pneumonia. Measures to control and eliminate MTCT of syphilis have failed on ...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 31 January 2019Source: Journal of Molecular BiologyAuthor(s): Blair Armistead, Elizabeth Oler, Kristina Adams Waldorf, Lakshmi RajagopalAbstractGroup B Streptococcus (GBS) is a β-hemolytic Gram-positive bacterium that colonizes the lower genital tract of approximately 18% of women globally as an asymptomatic member of the gastrointestinal and/or vaginal flora. If established in other host niches, however, GBS is highly pathogenic. During pregnancy, ascending GBS infection from the vagina to the intrauterine space is associated with preterm birth, stillbirth, and fetal injury. In addi...
Source: Journal of Molecular Biology - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs
More News: Health | Men | Meningitis | Pneumonia | Pregnancy | Women