Rectal Prolapse in Children: An Update to Causes, Clinical Presentation, and Management

Conclusions: Constipation remains the main cause of rectal prolapse. Cystic fibrosis is no longer a common etiology for rectal prolapse, because of the implementation of newborn screening. Patients with social stressors or atypical behavior may be at risk for recurrent rectal prolapse.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Original Articles: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

Related Links:

We present an extremely rare case of a 3-year-old child with a primary carcinoid tumor of the prostate. A 3-year-old boy presented with failure to thrive, constipation, recurrent respiratory tract infections, and pain in the genital area. His karyotype was normal and cystic fibrosis and coeliac disease were excluded prior to further investigation. An abdominopelvic computed tomography scan revealed a prostatic mass. Transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy was therefore performed and pathological examination revealed a carcinoid tumor.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Pediatric Case Reports Source Type: research
We present an extremely rare case of a 3-year-old child with a primary carcinoid tumour of the prostate. A 3-year-old boy presented with failure to thrive, constipation, recurrent respiratory tract infections and pain in the genital area. His karyotype was normal and cystic fibrosis and coeliac disease were excluded prior to further investigation. An abdominopelvic CT scan revealed a prostatic mass. Transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy was therefore performed and pathological examination revealed a carcinoid tumour.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundCystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was recently found in the enteric nervous system, where its role is unclear. We aimed to identify which enteric neuronal structures express CFTR, whether CFTR modulates enteric neurotransmission and if altered CFTR expression is associated with slow transit constipation (STC).MethodsImmunofluorescence double labeling was performed to localize CFTR with various neuronal and glial cell markers in the human colon. The immunoreactivity (IR) of CFTR and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) on myenteric plexus of control and STC colon was quantitatively ana...
Source: Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Question: A 28-year-old woman with cystic fibrosis, mild lung disease, and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, without previous surgery, consulted for a 2-week history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain. The patient denied associated symptoms such as fever, diarrhea, or constipation. Physical examination revealed a painful palpable mass at the right lower abdominal quadrant. Blood tests, including C-reactive protein, were within normal limits and fecal calprotectin was high (234 μg/g feces; normal,
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Electronic Clinical Challenges and Images in GI Source Type: research
Authors: Sarti F, Wolf K, Talsma J, Pierce-Talsma S PMID: 31233115 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: J Am Osteopath Assoc Source Type: research
Conclusion: These findings support the use of OMT as a method for the management of chronic constipation and DIOS in the CF population. However, because of the small population size, more research with larger populations is needed. PMID: 31233114 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: J Am Osteopath Assoc Source Type: research
Distal intestinal obstruction syndrome (DIOS) is a common complication in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) [1]. DIOS occurs in 10 to 40% of all CF-patients. The risk of developing DIOS is considered higher in the early post-transplant period due to dehydration, immobility, intake of opiates and post-operative adynamic gut [2]. Patients suffer from prolonged intestinal passage or even gastric paresis due to polymedication leading to chronic constipation long-term following lung transplant (LTX) [2].
Source: Journal of Cystic Fibrosis - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion: The majority of inpatient OMM consultations were placed for musculoskeletal complaints, followed by newborn feeding problems. Although it is clear that some physicians think that OMT will help their patients for the aforementioned conditions, the number was still quite low, suggesting that many physicians may be unaware that OMT can help patients with conditions such as respiratory disorder, postoperative recovery, and constipation. There are many opportunities for treatment teams to be ordering OMM consultations as a way to reduce morbidity in their patients. PMID: 31034068 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: J Am Osteopath Assoc Source Type: research
Distal intestinal obstruction syndrome (DIOS) is a debilitating condition which is unique to Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Constipation is increasingly common in CF patients as a result of the altered fluid composition of the intestine caused by the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene defect. The incidence of both DIOS and constipation is increased in CF-patients post lung transplant1-2.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: 740 Source Type: research
A 5-year-old girl with a family history of cystic fibrosis presented with constipation, poor weight gain, and a BMI below the third percentile. Three sweat chloride tests were indeterminate, aCFTR analysis panel was negative, and whole-genome sequence analysis revealed 1 cystic fibrosis –causing mutation. What would you do next?
Source: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
More News: Children | Constipation | Cystic Fibrosis | Gastroenterology | Nutrition | Pediatrics | Study