The benefits and mechanisms of exercise training for Parkinson's disease

Publication date: Available online 22 January 2020Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Ya-Shuo Feng, Si-Dong Yang, Zi-Xuan Tan, Man-Man Wang, Ying Xing, Fang Dong, Feng ZhangAbstractParkinson's disease (PD) is a significantly progressive neurodegenerative disease characterised by both motor and nonmotor disorders. The main pathological characteristics of PD consist of the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the formation of alpha-synuclein-containing Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra. Currently, the main therapeutic method for PD is anti-Parkinson medications, including levodopa, madopar, sirelin, and so on. However, the effect of pharmacological treatment has its own limitations, the most significant of which is that the therapeutic effect of dopaminergic treatments gradually diminishes with time. Exercise training, as an adjunctive treatment and complementary therapy, can improve the plasticity of cortical striatum and increase the release of dopamine. Exercise training has been proven to effectively improve motor disorders (including balance, gait, risk of falls and physical function) and nonmotor disorders (such as sleep impairments, cognitive function and quality of life) in PD patients. In recent years, various types of exercise training have been used to treat PD. In this review, we summarise the exercise therapy mechanisms and the protective effects of different types of exercise training on PD patients.Graphical abstract
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research

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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This article highlights some of these challenges in the design of lifestyle studies in PD, and suggests a more coordinated international effort is required, including ongoing longitudinal observational studies. In combination with pharmaceutical treatments, healthy lifestyle behaviors may slow the progression of PD, empower patients, and reduce disease burden. For optimal care of people with PD, it is important to close this gap in current knowledge and discover whether such associations exist. Introduction Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related complex progressive neurodegenerative disorder, with key p...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Authors: Jang JH, Jung K, Kim JS, Jung I, Yoo H, Moon C Abstract Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by complex motor and nonmotor symptoms. The clinical diagnosis of PD is defined by bradykinesia and other cardinal motor features, although several nonmotor symptoms are also related to disability, an impaired quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Levodopa, which is used as a standard pharmacotherapy for PD, has limitations including a short half-life, fluctuations in efficacy, and dyskinesias with long-term use. There have been efforts ...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Conclusion: Evidence suggests pimavanserin attenuates PDP symptoms with few adverse effects and little risk of worsening motor function. With limited treatment options for PDP, pimavanserin represents an important therapeutic innovation. KEYWORDS: Pimavanserin, ACP-103, Parkinson’s disease psychosis INTRODUCTION Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 40 to 1,000 persons/100,000, with increased occurrence in older individuals.[1] PD is characterized by progressive neurodegeneration that manifests in the early stages as mild cognitive impairment and moderate motor dysfunction,...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Movement Disorders Neurology Parkinson's disease Psychiatry Psychopharmacology psychosis Review Schizophrenia ACP-103 Parkinson’s disease psychosis Pimavanserin Source Type: research
Publication date: 2017 Source:International Review of Neurobiology, Volume 134 Author(s): Indu Subramanian The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy in nonmotor symptoms (NMS) for Parkinson disease (PD) is growing worldwide. Well-performed, systematic evidence-based research is largely lacking in this area and many studies include various forms of CAM with small patient numbers and a lack of standardization of the approaches studied. Taichi, Qigong, dance, yoga, mindfulness, acupuncture, and other CAM therapies are reviewed and there is some evidence for the following: Taichi in sleep and PDQ39; danc...
Source: International Review of Neurobiology - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 July 2017 Source:International Review of Neurobiology Author(s): Indu Subramanian The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy in nonmotor symptoms (NMS) for Parkinson disease (PD) is growing worldwide. Well-performed, systematic evidence-based research is largely lacking in this area and many studies include various forms of CAM with small patient numbers and a lack of standardization of the approaches studied. Taichi, Qigong, dance, yoga, mindfulness, acupuncture, and other CAM therapies are reviewed and there is some evidence for the following: Taichi in sleep an...
Source: International Review of Neurobiology - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 4 July 2017 Source:International Review of Neurobiology Author(s): Nataliya Titova, K Ray Chaudhuri Nonmotor symptoms (NMS) of Parkinson's disease (PD) are integral to the condition largely regarded as a motor syndrome. A range of NMS underpin the prodromal stage of Parkinson's and are present with variable frequency, range, and nature across the whole journey of a patient with Parkinson's from the onset of the motor disease to palliative stage. These symptoms also are key determinants of quality of life of the patient as well as the carer. Despite this, recognition management and focuse...
Source: International Review of Neurobiology - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Conclusion. The findings of LSF treatment have clear clinical effects in patients with sialorrhea and frequent overnight urination. LSF thus appears to be a potential choice as an additional drug that can improve the sialorrhea and frequent overnight urination symptoms of PD patients. PMID: 28484503 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Parkinson's disease, a progressive neuro-degeneration of multiple systems damaging motor and non-motor functions, affects individual and societal dimensions negatively. In addition to standard treatments, complementary and alternative medicine has been adopted, in which acupuncture, a traditional Chinese medical practice by needle penetration at specific stimulation points (acupoints) along the body, indicates positive outcomes in this illness. Apart from offering an overview of using acupuncture in Parkinson's disease, this literature review analyses the effects of acupuncture on Parkinson's-induced physical symptoms and ...
Source: Geriatric Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Feature Article Source Type: research
Abstract Over the decades, pharmaceutical treatments, particularly dopaminergic (DAergic) drugs have been considered as the main therapy against motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). It is proposed that DAergic drugs in combination with other medications, such as monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors, catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibitors, anticholinergics and other new developed non-DAergic drugs can make a better control of motor symptoms or alleviate levodopa-induced motor complications. Moreover, non-motor symptoms of PD, such as depression, sleep disorders, cognitive impairment and others caused by int...
Source: Current Neuropharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Neuropharmacol Source Type: research
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