Placental magnetic resonance imaging Part I: the normal placenta

AbstractMounting evidence suggests that the placenta is involved in nearly all abnormalities of pregnancy and fetal development. Traditional imaging evaluation of the placenta by ultrasound has more recently been complemented by MRI for complex cases requiring additional information, such as in the diagnosis of the placenta accreta spectrum (placenta accreta, increta and percreta). MRI can often help delineate the safest approach to delivery and adds diagnostic certainty to enable prognostication and to avoid potentially lethal complications. Increasingly, prenatal MRI has become the purview of the pediatric imager and is becoming the standard of care for select gestational indications. However, placental MRI might be unfamiliar to the radiologist. Thus, we provide a simple and systematic approach to evaluating the placenta by MRI, to enable delivery planning and family counseling.
Source: Pediatric Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 20 February 2020Source: Case Reports in Women's HealthAuthor(s): Antonella Iannaccone, Marvin Darkwah Oppong, Philipp Dammann, Rainer Kimmig, Angela KöningerAbstractA fetal subdural hematoma (SDH) was diagnosed in a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD) during a routine ultrasound exam in the 30th week of pregnancy. A scan performed a few days earlier had revealed no abnormalities. After interdisciplinary consultation with neurosurgeons and neonatologists, a cesarean section was performed since acute subdural bleeding was hypothesized and the mother's condition was critical. After s...
Source: Case Reports in Womens Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionNormal sizes and signal intensities for adrenal glands are reported. Visibility of adrenal glands on T2-W images was 90.3 –97.2% up to 30 weeks but declined thereafter. Visibility on T1-W images increased in the third trimester. Adrenal gland sizes increased with gestational age.
Source: Pediatric Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
This article discusses the 4 main imaging modalities used to evaluate reproductive-aged women: ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and fluoroscopy. For each modality, major clinical indications are described, along with important technical considerations unique to imaging reproductive-aged women. Finally, key safety issues are discussed, particularly with regard to imaging pregnant patients. PMID: 32044002 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Radiologic Clinics of North America - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Radiol Clin North Am Source Type: research
ConclusionThis is a rare case of a twin pregnancy contained in a noncommunicating rudimentary uterine horn. The presence of this horn was not detected on ultrasonography or MRI.
Source: Case Reports in Womens Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 27 December 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical GastroenterologyAuthor(s): Emma Flanagan, Sally BellAbstractImaging studies are useful in the diagnostic evaluation of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, concern often exists about the safety of imaging for pregnant and lactating women and their infants, leading to unwarranted avoidance of beneficial diagnostic tests or disruption of breastfeeding. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are not associated with ionizing radiation and are the imaging techniques of choice for pregnant patients. Safety of MRI contra...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
AbstractAcute abdominal pain in pregnancy remains a clinically challenging presentation, often requiring imaging. The threat of morbidity and mortality to both mother and fetus necessitates quick and accurate imaging diagnosis, often via ultrasound. However, many of the common causes of acute abdominal pain are not readily diagnosed with sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly favored in this setting. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the reader with common pathologies which may be encountered in pregnant females presenting with acute abdominal pain requiring emergent MRI.
Source: Emergency Radiology - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
This study is to determine accuracy of abdominal ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for placenta accreta in the second and third trimester of pregnancy and to define the most relevant features of abdominal ultrasound and MRI for placenta accreta prediction. Between September 2012 and September 2018, 245 high risk of placenta accreta in the second trimester of pregnancy were prenatal diagnosed by abdominal ultrasound and MRI and they were followed up until the end of pregnancy. Forty-six patients at the second trimester of pregnancy and 40 patients at the third trimester of pregnancy were confirmed as...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Observational Study Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 27 December 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical GastroenterologyAuthor(s): Emma Flanagan, Sally BellAbstractImaging studies are useful in the diagnostic evaluation of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, concern often exists about the safety of imaging for pregnant and lactating women and their infants, leading to unwarranted avoidance of beneficial diagnostic tests or disruption of breastfeeding. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are not associated with ionizing radiation and are the imaging techniques of choice for pregnant patients. Safety of MRI contra...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
AbstractAcute gynaecologic disorders are commonly encountered in daily clinical practice of emergency departments (ED) and predominantly occur in reproductive-age women. Since clinical presentation may be nonspecific and physical findings are often inconclusive, imaging is required for a timely and accurate diagnosis. Although ultrasound is the ideal non-invasive first-line technique, nowadays multidetector computed tomography (CT) is extensively used in the ED, particularly when a non-gynaecologic disorder is suspected and differential diagnosis from gastrointestinal and urologic diseases is needed. As a result, CT often ...
Source: Insights into Imaging - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
ConclusionsManagement of delivery in cases of suspected autosomal recessive renal polycystic kidney disease needs to be discussed because of the risk of abdominal dystocia. The route and timing of delivery depend on the size of the fetal abdominal circumference and the gestational age. The rate of kidney growth must also be taken into account.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
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