Ebola and Cholera Epidemics: An ALNAP Lessons Paper

Source: Active Learning Network for Accountability and Performance in Humanitarian Action (ALNAP). Published: 1/17/2020. This 41-page paper aims to inform future humanitarian responses to epidemics or in contexts of an epidemic by drawing lessons for humanitarian practitioners from the responses to Ebola and cholera epidemics since 2010. It details nine lessons to limit the number of cases and deaths, and three lessons to limit the spillover effects of epidemics. It discusses how epidemics are happening more frequently and taking more lives in contexts where humanitarian actors operate. (PDF)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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