We All Age in the Same Way, but with a Distribution of Outcomes

Today's research materials are representative of numerous initiatives aiming to produce taxonomies of the biochemistry of aging, to catalog the observed variations. Yet, with the exception of a very small number of unlucky souls bearing rare harmful mutations, we all age for the same underlying reasons. The same processes of metabolism produce the same forms of cell and tissue damage, leading to the same downstream dysfunctions and the same ultimately fatal age-related conditions. Yes, there is some variation in outcome. For all that aging is a universally similar process of multiple interacting forms of damage, some portions of its consequences progress modestly more rapidly or modestly more slowly from individual to individual, a distribution of outcomes that largely results from lifestyle choices and random happenstance, rather than from genetic variation. Thus many researchers are interested in this distribution, perhaps more so than in doing something about the challenge of aging, the death and suffering it causes. Given this view of the situation, I would say that somewhat more scientific effort goes into cataloging the differences between individuals than is merited. Examining long-lived people, with the goal of producing interventions that might make more people live incrementally longer in good health, is a terrible strategy, when compared with the alternative of directly addressing the common causes of aging, which might make everyone live considerably longer...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

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Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined 9293 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of total cholesterol, free- and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, and particle concentration. Fourteen subclasses of decreasing size and their lipid constituents were analysed: six subclasses were very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), one intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), three low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and four subclasses were high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Remnant lipoproteins were VLDL and IDL combined. Mean nonfasting cholesterol concentration was 72...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined 9293 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of total cholesterol, free- and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, and particle concentration. Fourteen subclasses of decreasing size and their lipid constituents were analysed: six subclasses were very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), one intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), three low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and four subclasses were high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Remnant lipoproteins were VLDL and IDL combined. Mean nonfasting cholesterol concentration was 72...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Compared with 1996, participants entering CR in 2015 were older, more overweight, and had a higher prevalence of coronary risk factors. Lipid values improved substantially concurrent with increased statin use. While the percentage of female participants increased, they continue to be underrepresented. Patients with heart valve repair/replacement now constitute 10.6% of the patients enrolled. Clinical programs need to recognize changing characteristics of attendees to best tailor interventions.
Source: Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: Cardiac Rehabilitation Source Type: research
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study shows that mRNA levels of the aging related lamin A splice variant progerin, associated with premature aging in HGPS, were significantly upregulated in subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Moreover, our data revealed a significantly positive correlation of BMI with progerin mRNA. These data provide to our knowledge for the first-time evidence for a possible involvement of progerin in previously observed accelerated aging of overweight and obese individuals potentially limiting their longevity. Our results also showed that progerin mRNA was positively correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP). This might suggest an as...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Compared with 1996, participants entering CR in 2015 were older, more overweight, and had a higher prevalence of coronary risk factors. Lipid values improved substantially concurrent with increased statin use. While the percentage of female participants increased, they continue to be underrepresented. Patients with heart valve repair/replacement now constitute 10.6% of the patients enrolled. Clinical programs need to recognize changing characteristics of attendees to best tailor interventions. PMID: 31009394 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev Source Type: research
Giuseppe Ristagno1*, Francesca Fumagalli1, Barbara Bottazzi2, Alberto Mantovani2,3,4, Davide Olivari1, Deborah Novelli1 and Roberto Latini1 1Department of Cardiovascular Research, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research IRCCS, Milan, Italy 2Humanitas Clinical and Research Center-IRCCS, Milan, Italy 3Humanitas University, Milan, Italy 4The William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom The long pentraxin PTX3 is a member of the pentraxin family produced locally by stromal and myeloid cells in response to proinflammatory signals and microbial moieties. The p...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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