Juggling Priorities for Multiple Elders Reality for Many Caregivers

...No rest for the caregiver. I climbed back in the car and fought my way through the streets to Mom. It wasn’t another false alarm. Mom really had fallen, and as usually happens after a fall, I couldn’t get her up off the floor by myself. I had to call the EMTs — again. Thankfully, this time she wasn’t seriously hurt. Hours later, once I’d settled Mom in her bed, I forced my way back through the still unplowed streets toward home, hoping for a couple of hours of sleep before morning, when I had to take my uncle to his neurology appointment for a post-stroke checkup. Continue reading on HealthCentral to learn more about how caregivers must often juggle priorities to keep on top of the needs of multiple family members in need: Carol is the Candid Caregiver Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook                Related StoriesAre Your Older Parents on Too Many Meds?Caregiving Can Take a Toll on Your MarriageWe Can Support Our Surviving Parent, but We Can't Erase Their Pain 
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs

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The health tracking market is booming. What with smart bracelets, smart beds and smart chest straps, the tracking industry has penetrated the lives of old and young from the time they wake up in the morning to the time they hit the bed at night (and beyond). It’s no wonder that user penetration is projected to reach 25% of the adult population by 2022 in the US alone and that these devices are being adopted by over 30% of individuals across all age groups. Naturally, I count among those adopters. I call myself a data geek, using the data accumulated from myriads of health trackers to help me make more informed hea...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers digital health digital technology health data digital health sensors Source Type: blogs
In the middle of the night, I wake up feeling warm. I open the window and pull my hair back into a ponytail and drink some water. Then I glance at my phone, delete a few things, and see some spam. I hit unsubscribe and go back to bed. Then I lie there thinking, What if by opening that spam email I got myself hacked? What if I just sent everyone in my contact list a Burger King ad at two in the morning? Now wide awake, I move on to other concerns: my parents’ health, my stepson’s college tuition, pending deadlines. Hours roll by. I tackle real-life math problems: how many weeks I have before getting my next free...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Gen X healthy sleep insomnia Source Type: news
By AMEYA KULKARNI, MD When Samuel Morse left his New Haven home to paint a portrait of the Maquis du Lafayette in Washington DC, it was the last time he would see his pregnant wife. Shortly after his arrival in Washington, his wife developed complications during childbirth. A messenger took several days on horseback to relay the message to Mr Morse. Because the trip back to New Haven took several more, his wife had died by the time he arrived at their home.  So moved was he by the tragedy of lost time that he dedicated the majority of the rest of his life to make sure that this would never happen to anyone again. H...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Policy Medical Practice Ameya Kulkarni Global Health Maternal mortality public health Source Type: blogs
Pocket-size ultrasound devices that cost 50 times less than the machines in hospitals (and connect to your phone). Virtual reality that speeds healing in rehab. Artificial intelligence that’s better than medical experts at spotting lung tumors. These are just some of the innovations now transforming medicine at a remarkable pace. No one can predict the future, but it can at least be glimpsed in the dozen inventions and concepts below. Like the people behind them, they stand at the vanguard of health care. Neither exhaustive nor exclusive, the list is, rather, representative of the recasting of public health and medic...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized HealthSummit19 technology Source Type: news
Mind-reading exoskeletons, digital tattoos, 3D printed drugs, RFID implants for recreational purposes: mindblowing innovations come to medicine and healthcare almost every single day. We shortlisted some of the greatest ideas and developments that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine, but we found so many that we had trouble fitting them into one article. Here are the first ten spectacular medical innovations to watch for. 1) Mixed reality opens new ways for medical education Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality are all technologies opening new worlds for the human senses. While the difference between...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing artificial food brain-computer interface cyborg digital tattoos drug development exoskeleton gamification google glass health insurance Healthcare Innovation List Medical education medical techn Source Type: blogs
This study elucidates the potential to use mitochondria from different donors (PAMM) to treat UVR stress and possibly other types of damage or metabolic malfunctions in cells, resulting in not only in-vitro but also ex-vivo applications. Gene Therapy in Mice Alters the Balance of Macrophage Phenotypes to Slow Atherosclerosis Progression https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/07/gene-therapy-in-mice-alters-the-balance-of-macrophage-phenotypes-to-slow-atherosclerosis-progression/ Atherosclerosis causes a sizable fraction of all deaths in our species. It is the generation of fatty deposits in blood vessel...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is an extensive endogenous signaling system with multiple elements, the number of which may be increasing as scientists continue to elucidate its role in human health and disease. The ECS is seemingly ubiquitous in animal species and is modulated by diet, sleep, exercise, stress, and a multitude of other factors, including exposure to phytocannabinoids, like Cannabidiol (CBD). Modulating the activity of this system may offer tremendous therapeutic promise for a diverse scope of diseases, ranging from mental health disorders, neurological and movement disorders, pain, autoi...
Source: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Altern Ther Health Med Source Type: research
Conclusion Imagine how much more you could accomplish if you weren’t sitting there waiting for a stroke of motivation to hit you? While it’s nice to feel those moments of pure energy and inspiration while performing a task, those moments are far and few between. There are always going to be tasks we have to do that we don’t necessarily want to do. Rather than waste time by putting off the inevitable, follow the steps above and take action instead. Through her own spiritual wellness journey, Sonya aspires to help millennials use mindfulness to thrive in today’s world. Sign up for her free guide...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured motivation productivity tips self improvement success Source Type: blogs
The objective of this presentation is to explore historical, scientific, interventional, and other differences between the two paradigms, so that innovators, researchers, practitioners, policy-makers, patients, end-users, and others can gain clarity with respect to both the explicit and implicit assumptions associated with brain advancement agendas of any kind. Over the course of three decades, a series of brain-centric, evolution-inspired insights have been articulated with increasing refinement, as principles of allostasis (Sterling and Eyer, 1988; Sterling, 2004, 2012, 2014). Allostasis recognizes that the role of the ...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Silvia Pregnolato1*, Elavazhagan Chakkarapani1, Anthony R. Isles2 and Karen Luyt1 1Department of Neonatal Neurology, Translational Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom 2Behavioural Genetics Group, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom Preterm birth complications are the leading cause of child death worldwide and a top global health priority. Among the survivors, the risk of life-long disabilities is high, including cerebral palsy and impairment of movement, cognition, and behavior. U...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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