Physically active children with epilepsy have good objective sleep duration and efficiency despite subjective reports of fatigue and sleep problems

Publication date: March 2020Source: Epilepsy &Behavior, Volume 104, Part AAuthor(s): Jeffrey Do, Richard J. Webster, Patricia E. Longmuir, Sara Ieradi, Deepti Reddy, Sharon Whiting, Daniela PohlAbstractObjectiveThe aim of this study was to longitudinally characterize in children with epilepsy the objective and subjective sleep quality and the relationship between increased physical activity and sleep as well as measures of psychosocial well-being.MethodsBaseline physical activity and sleep were established in children with epilepsy over four weeks, prior to a 12-week exercise intervention (weekly meeting with exercise counselor). Participants continuously wore a wrist pedometer (Fitbit Flex®) to capture daily number of steps, sleep efficiency, and total sleep time. The Early Childhood Epilepsy Severity Scale (E-Chess) assessed baseline epilepsy severity. Subjective sleep quality (Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, CSHQ), quality of life (KIDSCREEN-27; Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, PedsQL™, 4.0 Core), fatigue (PedsQL™ Multidimensional Fatigue Scale), depression (Children's Depression Inventory-Short), and anxiety (Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children) were assessed pre- and post-interventions.ResultsOur cohort of 22 children with epilepsy aged 8–14 years was similarly active to peers (11,271 ± 3189 mean steps per day) and displayed normal sleeping patterns (mean sleep efficiency: 87.4% ± 3.08 and mean total sl...
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research

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Abstract Clinical factors associated with daytime sleepiness and insomnia in persons with epilepsy (PWE) were examined in this cross-sectional study of 126 participants (men, 50.8%). Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS; score of ≥11 on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)) was noted in 17.5% of participants (mean score, 6.1 ± 4.2), and moderate-to-severe insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) scores of ≥15) was noted in 20.6% (mean score, 7.8 ± 6.4). Linear regression analyses revealed that ESS scores were independently associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA; snoring, tiredness, obse...
Source: Epilepsy and Behaviour - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Epilepsy Behav Source Type: research
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to longitudinally characterize in children with epilepsy the objective and subjective sleep quality and the relationship between increased physical activity and sleep as well as measures of psychosocial well-being. METHODS: Baseline physical activity and sleep were established in children with epilepsy over four weeks, prior to a 12-week exercise intervention (weekly meeting with exercise counselor). Participants continuously wore a wrist pedometer (Fitbit Flex®) to capture daily number of steps, sleep efficiency, and total sleep time. The Early Childhood Epil...
Source: Epilepsy and Behaviour - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Epilepsy Behav Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our data are in accordance with previous findings outlining that N + insomniacs have higher PSQI scores than N-. Our results do not confirm the suggested association between napping and depressive or obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Conversely, we found a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0014) in EAT scores in N + and N-. Hyperarousal and REM sleep instability in insomniac patients may create an unbalance of the neuroendocrine hypothalamic regulation leading to an appetite alteration. PMID: 31790624 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Nord J Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: Insomnia symptoms and obesity were related to overall aggressive behavior in PWE independent of depressive symptoms. The individual subscales of the AQ were correlated differently with the various factors including male sex, obesity, depressive symptoms, anxiety, insomnia symptoms, epilepsy severity, polytherapy, and the use of perampanel.
Source: Seizure - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Cannabidiol (CBD) oil and other products containing CBD are being touted as a natural, organic remedy for a wide range of women’s health concerns. Sellers of these products make many claims: CBD has calming effects on sleep, mood, and anxiety; eases hot flashes and improves bone density by balancing hormonal changes of menopause; and has anti-inflammatory properties that clear skin, cure acne, and calm rosacea. It’s promoted for PMS symptoms like bloating and mood swings. And CBD-infused lubricants claim to boost arousal and enjoyment of sex. So, how much of this is true? First, what is CBD? CBD is a major ingr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Drugs and Supplements Health Marijuana Women's Health Source Type: blogs
ConclusionLevetiracetam had a higher association with PBAEs and more AE when compared to conventional AEDs. There was no differential correlation of AEDs with the following neuroendocrine markers: BDNF, HVA, 5-HIAA, and TAC. These facts necessitate exploration of other mechanisms for LEV-induced PBAEs.
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Psychiatric and physical disorders carried greatly increased risks and numbers of suicides in South Korea. Schizophrenia was the strongest risk factor, especially 35-65 years, and depression was the most common in suicide victims among ICD-10 disorders in South Korea. PMID: 31042694 [PubMed]
Source: Psychiatry Investigation - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatry Investig Source Type: research
Conclusion: It is the severity of PTSD symptoms in PNES patients that differentiates them from ES patients, although exposure to traumatic events is also frequent in ES patients. We demonstrated that suicidal ideation and suicide risk are equally high in the ES and PNES groups. Therefore, both groups require extreme vigilance in terms of suicidal risk.IntroductionA variety of interactions between epilepsy and psychiatric disorders have been described. One major interaction concerns the occurrence of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). As many as 30% of the cases in epilepsy centers for drug-resistant epilepsy appear...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Albert Sanfeliu1, Karsten Hokamp2, Michael Gill1 and Daniela Tropea1,3*1Neuropsychiatric Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, St James Hospital, Dublin, Ireland2Department of Genetics, School of Genetics and Microbiology, Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland3Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Trinity College Institute for Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, IrelandRett syndrome is a rare neuropsychiatric disorder with a wide symptomatology including impaired communication and movement, cardio-respiratory abno...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
According to a 2013 study published in JAMA Psychiatry, one out of seven mothers suffers from postpartum depression (PPD). That’s 14 percent of all new moms. Katherine Stone, founder of Postpartum Progress, makes a good point that more women will suffer from postpartum depression and related illnesses this year than the combined number of new cases for men and women of tuberculosis, leukemia, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy. Even though, according to Dr. Ruta Nonacs of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, PPD is the most common comp...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Pregnancy Self-Help Women's Issues Apathy Depressive Episode Postpartum Source Type: blogs
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