Hearing balance and communication jubilees exponents of the ‘twenties’: Théophile Bonet (1620–1689), the deaf author of ‘De Aurium Affectibus’

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Source: Hearing, Balance and Communication - Category: Audiology Authors: Source Type: research

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Some species of deaf moths can absorb as much as 85 per cent of the incoming sound energy from predatory bats — who use echolocation to detect them. The findings, published in Royal Society Interface today [26 February], reveal the moths, who are unable to hear the ultrasonic calls of bats, have evolved this clever defensive strategy to help it survive.
Source: University of Bristol news - Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Civil, Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering; Press Release Source Type: news
Authors: PMID: 32089539 [PubMed - in process]
Source: American Annals of the Deaf - Category: Audiology Tags: Am Ann Deaf Source Type: research
Abstract The effectiveness of a sight word intervention designed for Deaf students was investigated. Thirty students, grades 1-7, in an urban school for the Deaf received an 8-month intervention. A pretest/posttest design using a teacher-designed instrument, the Cumulative Bedrock Literacy Sight Word Assessment, and the Test of Silent Word Reading Fluency (Mather, Hammill, Allen, & Roberts, 2004) assessed increases in the number of sight words students could identify and the rate at which they could identify them. Paired-samples and independent-samples t tests and Pearson product-moment correlations were used ...
Source: American Annals of the Deaf - Category: Audiology Authors: Tags: Am Ann Deaf Source Type: research
This article contextualizes a nearly forgotten, century-old research corpus, The Fundamentals of Defectology. Drawing on Defectology, two dialectic arguments are developed, which synthesize Vygotsky's corpus, then juxtaposed it against contemporary theories and evidence. The first describes three principles of Vygotsky's framework for deaf pedagogy: positive differentiation, creative adaptation, and dynamic development. The second posits five propositions about deaf development: the biosocial proposition, the sensory delimitation-and-consciousness proposition, the adapted tools proposition, the multimodal proposition, and ...
Source: American Annals of the Deaf - Category: Audiology Authors: Tags: Am Ann Deaf Source Type: research
Abstract The authors (a) examine the available peer-reviewed research documenting the literacy achievement of deaf children educated in sign bilingual programs, (b) identify gaps in the empirical literature, and (c) propose directions for future research. This review was limited to studies that reported reading and writing outcomes. On this basis, only 3 studies were identified, representing those published over a period of approximately 20 years (1997-2017) and collectively reporting literacy outcomes for 127 deaf students. Overall, the studies indicate that the majority of participants were not achieving reading...
Source: American Annals of the Deaf - Category: Audiology Authors: Tags: Am Ann Deaf Source Type: research
Discussion Built on Rights-Based Arguments. Am Ann Deaf. 2020;164(5):546-559 Authors: Maia TG Abstract The author discusses rights-based arguments for and against cochlear implants in congenitally deaf children and analyzes whether CIs should be required by law or left to parental discretion. Positions for and against CIs are analyzed in light of two rights-based arguments: Griffin's theory on personhood as a solution to a conflict of rights and his theory on quality of life as a solution to a conflict between rights and welfare (Griffin, 2008). The question of whether CIs should be required by law is...
Source: American Annals of the Deaf - Category: Audiology Authors: Tags: Am Ann Deaf Source Type: research
Abstract A meta-analysis was conducted to investigate phonology's role in d/Deaf and hard of hearing (d/Dhh) children's development of reading, and their ability to access spoken-language phonology. A systematic search of databases and journals identified 27 studies, 7 of which met the inclusion criteria. The included studies, experimental or quasi-experimental in nature, were conducted over a 20-year period (1995-2016) with students ages 3-18 years. Other literature was identified to enhance the discussion and support the interpretations. The review showed that spoken language's phonology is one of the literacy s...
Source: American Annals of the Deaf - Category: Audiology Authors: Tags: Am Ann Deaf Source Type: research
PMID: 32089533 [PubMed - in process]
Source: American Annals of the Deaf - Category: Audiology Authors: Tags: Am Ann Deaf Source Type: research
(University of Bristol) Some species of deaf moths can absorb as much as 85 per cent of the incoming sound energy from predatory bats -- who use echolocation to detect them. The findings, published in Royal Society Interface today, reveal the moths, who are unable to hear the ultrasonic calls of bats, have evolved this clever defensive strategy to help it survive.
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: news
In this study, we overexpressed cochlear miR-182 in Sprague-Dawley rats by trans-round window niche delivery of miR-182 mimics. The rats subsequently received intraperitoneal injections of kanamycin and furosemide to induce acute cochlear outer hair cell death and permanent deafness. Auditory brainstem response tests showed that miR-182 attenuated permanent threshold shifts. Consistent with this result, miR-182 reduced the loss of outer hair cells and missing stereocilia. miR-182 treatment also increased the level of phosphoinositide-3 kinase regulatory subunit p85α in the outer hair cells after co-administration of ...
Source: Neuroscience Letters - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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