School Lunch Programmes for Progress

School feeding programme in Togo. Credit: WFP/João CavalcanteBy Jomo Kwame Sundaram and Wan Manan MudaKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Jan 21 2020 (IPS) If well planned, coordinated and implemented, a government funded school feeding programme for all primary school children can be progressively transformative. Such a programme, involving government departments and agencies working together, can benefit schoolchildren, their families, farmers and public health, now and in the future. Jomo Kwame Sundaram Such a scheme should comprehensively supply adequate food for all, especially schoolchildren, and improve their nutrition, thus overcoming hunger and malnutrition besides improving the children’s physical and mental development, and school learning, attendance, participation and performance. School meals, well planned by nutritionists and dieticians familiar with local food practices and alternatives, using safe food grown by family farmers free of toxic agrochemicals, and hygienically prepared, will significantly improve the nutrition, health and wellbeing of the children.   3-pronged approach A comprehensive and ambitious three-pronged approach to school feeding would go a long way to address contemporary malnutrition, of both micronutrient deficiencies of minerals and vitamins as well as overweight, obesity and other diet-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Nutrition education for schoolchildren must promote an adequate, balanced and comprehensive understand...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Labour TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

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Conditions:   Induction of Labor Affected Fetus / Newborn;   Obese Interventions:   Drug: Dinoprostone 10mg;   Device: single balloon Foley catheter Sponsors:   Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Besancon;   Hôpital Nord Franche-Comté Trévenans Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Authors: Vince K, Brkić M, Poljičanin T, Matijević R Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the association of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and pregnancy outcome among pregnant women in Croatia. Women who gave birth in Croatia in 2017 were categorised into four groups according to pre-pregnancy BMI and analysed regarding maternal characteristics and perinatal outcomes. Among 32,051 pregnant women, 5.3% were underweight, 65.5% had normal BMI, 20.4% were overweight and 8.8% were obese. Overweight and obese women had a higher prevalence of induction of labour and delivery by caesarean secti...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Source Type: research
ConclusionDelayed amniotomy>8 hours after starting oxytocin for labor induction was associated with higher odds of cesarean delivery. Significant delay in ROM should be avoided during labor induction.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: A policy of delivery at 39 weeks for class III obesity did not affect overall cesarean rate or rates of maternal or neonatal morbidity. Further investigation should evaluate subsets of women who may have a higher cesarean rate with this policy. PMID: 32020789 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Obesity - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Tags: Obesity (Silver Spring) Source Type: research
ConclusionAn attempt of vaginal birth is a reasonable option for short stature women. Maternal height could be included in the selection criteria for planned birth center or home birth.The customized gestational-related optimal weigh could be useful to identify large of gestational age fetus.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
This study was conducted with the aim to assess obesity-related adverse maternal, neonatal and perinatal outcomes using new Asian Indian guidelines.MethodologyPregnant women up to 16-week gestation on first visit were enrolled. There were two exposure groups: one with BMI  
Source: The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology of India - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Obese women have longer labors and are more likely to require a cesarean delivery. We hypothesized that high dose oxytocin would decrease time to delivery in an obese cohort undergoing an induction of labor. We randomized lean and obese women into four groups: lean women receiving low dose oxytocin, lean women receiving high dose oxytocin, obese women receiving low dose oxytocin and obese women receiving high dose oxytocin.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session III Source Type: research
To externally validate a published cesarean risk prediction model for nulliparous women undergoing labor induction in a cohort with class III obesity.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session IV Source Type: research
The proportion of obesity in women of reproductive age has been increasing throughout the years. Previous studies have shown that a high body mass index (BMI) is an independent risk factor for stillbirth. The purpose of this study was to determine if obese women should receive early induction of labour to decrease the risk of stillbirth in this population.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session III Source Type: research
Overweight and obese women follow slower labor curves and have higher rates of cesarean section than normal weight women. In vitro data suggest this may be due to changes in myometrial response to oxytocin. The purpose of this study is to observe differences in oxytocin dosing administered to women with varying body mass index (BMI) undergoing induction of labor who achieved vaginal birth.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session V Source Type: research
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