Application of chlorine dioxide and peroxyacetic acid during spray chilling as a potential antimicrobial intervention for beef carcasses.

Application of chlorine dioxide and peroxyacetic acid during spray chilling as a potential antimicrobial intervention for beef carcasses. Food Microbiol. 2020 May;87:103355 Authors: Kocharunchitt C, Mellefont L, Bowman JP, Ross T Abstract Enteric pathogens such as Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and Salmonella spp. continue to be a major food safety concern for the beef industry. Currently, no single method is completely effective in controlling these pathogens during carcass processing. Previous research, however, suggested that STEC might become more susceptible to oxidative damage when exposed to carcass chilling (King et al., 2016). We aimed to test that hypothesis by evaluating the antimicrobial effects of an oxidant (chlorine dioxide, ClO2 or peroxyacetic acid, PAA) on beef meat during a simulated spray chilling process (sprayed for 4 s every 15 min for 36 cycles) and/or when applied (sprayed for 144 s) prior to spray chilling with water. In all experiments, the inactivating effects of oxidants were greatest on fat surfaces and much less effective on lean surfaces. ClO2 at 15 ppm, a non-lethal level for E. coli under optimal growth conditions, caused higher log reductions in E. coli numbers (approximately 3-log reduction) when applied during spray chilling than when applied immediately prior to 'normal' spray chilling (approximately 1-log reduction). This confirms the hypothesis that E. coli are more susceptible to oxidative s...
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research

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ConclusionsThe results highlight the importance of monitoring farm environments for Johne ’s disease. This disease is a growing concern for dairy and beef producers in Ireland, and sampling the farm environment may offer a useful means to rapidly screen for the presence of MAP. Non-pathogenic common enteric commensal and multiple-drug-resistantE. coli may contribute to AMR acting as a reservoir and transferring resistance to other species/pathogens in the environment.
Source: Irish Veterinary Journal - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA and gene control in bacteria edited by Dr. M. Guillier and F. Repoila.
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Gene Regulatory Mechanisms - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
In this study, a portable analyzer was developed to rapidly and simultaneously detect five types of foodborne bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella, Shigella, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) on a centrifugal chip. Integration of the processes, including bacteria lysis, visible loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) and detection, was accomplished within 70 minutes. The analyzer has a compact size (151 × 134 × 110 mm) and two motors positioned on both sides of the centrifugal chip. The upper motor was used to generate a rotating magnetic f...
Source: Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical - Category: Chemistry Source Type: research
te; T Abstract Bacteria within biofilms are more resistant to antibiotics and chemical agents than planktonic bacteria in suspension. Treatment of biofilm-associated infections inevitably involves high dosages and prolonged courses of antimicrobial agents; therefore, there is a potential risk of the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Due to the high prevalence of AMR and its association with biofilm formation, investigation of more effective anti-biofilm agents is required. From ancient times, herbs and spices have been used to preserve foods, and their antimicrobial, anti-biofilm and anti-quorum sensi...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
Abstract Previously, we demonstrated capture and concentration of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica ser. Typhimurium using magnetic ionic liquids (MILs), followed by rapid isothermal detection of captured cells via recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). Here, we report work intended to explore the broader potential of MILs as novel pre-analytical capture reagents in food safety and related applications. Specifically, we evaluated the capacity of the ([P66614+][Ni(hfacac)3-]) ("Ni(II)") MIL to bind a wider range of human pathogens using a panel of Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolate...
Source: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Anal Bioanal Chem Source Type: research
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Source: Briefings in Bioinformatics - Category: Bioinformatics Authors: Tags: Brief Bioinform Source Type: research
Abstract We have previously demonstrated that human vaginal Lactobacillus crispatus 2029 (LC2029) strain is highly adhesive to cervicovaginal epithelial cells, exhibits antagonistic activity against genitourinary pathogens and expresses surface-layer protein (Slp). The aims of the present study were elucidation of Slp structural and immunomodulatory characteristics and its roles in protective properties of the whole vaginal LC2029 bacteria against foodborne pathogens. Enteric Caco-2 and colon HT-29 cell lines were used as the in vitro models of the human intestinal epithelial layer. LC2029 strain has two homologou...
Source: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Int J Biol Macromol Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Ethnopharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
This study focused on the development of a novel polylactic acid (PLA) film which incorporated with sodium chlorite (NaClO2) and GDL for ClO2(g) generation. The effects of PLA amount, NaClO2+GDL/PLA ratio, NaClO2/GDL ratio, temperature and relative humidity on the release profiles of ClO2(g) were elucidated. The storage test indicated that film efficacy was well maintained after 4 weeks of storage under ambient conditions. The microbial inactivation results revealed that ClO2(g) generated from the films reduced populations of surface-inoculated Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 from ca. 5 log CFU/tomato to undetectab...
Source: Food Research International - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
l M Abstract Salmonella enterica is a foodborne pathogen often leading to gastroenteritis and is commonly acquired by consumption of contaminated food of animal origin. However, frequency of outbreaks linked to the consumption of fresh or minimally processed food of non-animal origin is increasing. New infection routes of S. enterica by vegetables, fruits, nuts and herbs have to be considered. This leads to special interest in S. enterica interactions with leafy products, e.g. salads, that are mainly consumed in minimally processed form. The attachment of S. enterica to salad is a crucial step in contamination, bu...
Source: Applied and Environmental Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Appl Environ Microbiol Source Type: research
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