Impact of opioid dose escalation on the development of substance use disorders, accidents, self-inflicted injuries, opioid overdoses and alcohol and non-opioid drug-related overdoses: a retrospective cohort study - Hayes CJ, Krebs EE, Hudson T, Brown J, Li C, Martin BC.

AIM: To understand the potential harmful effects of dose escalation among patients with chronic, non-cancer pain (CNCP) on chronic opioid therapy. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: United States Veterans Healthcare Administration. PARTIC...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

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Background Chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) among patients with substance use disorder (SUD) poses a risk for worse treatment outcomes. Understanding the association of CNCP with SUD is important for informing the need and potential benefits of pain assessm...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe following review will highlight recent studies reporting associations between alcohol and tobacco use with non-medical opioid use in the post-operative period, as well as patients with chronic non-malignant and cancer pain.Recent FindingsThe use of alcohol, tobacco, and other illegal substances are associated with an increased risk of opioid use disorder in the post-operative setting and in patients with chronic non-malignant and cancer pain.SummaryOpioid overdoses are at a national epidemic afflicting the general population. A comprehensive assessment of the risk for opioid use disorder is adv...
Source: Current Anesthesiology Reports - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Background: Prescription opioids (PO) have been widely used for chronic non-cancer pain, with commensurate concerns for overdose. The long-term effect of these medications on non-overdose mortality in the general population remains poorly understood...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
BACKGROUND: The US is experiencing an epidemic of opioid overdoses which may be at least partially due to an over-reliance on opioid analgesics in the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain and subsequent escalation to heroin or illicit fentanyl. As Texas wa...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
Cliffside Malibu does not condone the use of the term “addict” when referring to people suffering from the disorder of addiction. However, we do understand that others still may use the term in order to find information. Many people may find themselves asking the question, “am I an opioid addict?” if they feel as if their use has spiraled out of control. There are many ways to find out if you may have become addicted to opioids, as well as ways to get help and find treatment. How Opioid Addiction Begins Nearly 80% of heroin users started with prescription opioids, which puts prescription drugs and ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals addiction treatment opioid opioid crisis opioids pharmaceutical addiction pharmaceutical drug abuse treatment Source Type: blogs
With  clear evidence that restricting the number of prescriptions increased the death rate by driving non-medical users to heroin and fentanyl, the last thing one wants to hear about is a politician planning to double down on this deadly policy by calling for further prescription limits for patients in pain.Yet Senator Robert Portman (R-OH) is  proposing legislation that would impose a national 3-day limit on opioid prescriptions following surgeries. He will be kind enough to allow exceptions for people dealing with cancer, chronic pain, and “other serious matters”—whatever that means....
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Advances in cancer treatment have led to a growing number of survivors. At least 40% of those survivors live with chronic pain and need pain control medication. This coincides with an epidemic of opioid misuse and overdose deaths, resulting in restrictive ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news
This study indicated that switch from H2 blockers to PPIs reduced delirium and, thus, providing an appropriate strategy to combat drug-induced delirium using antiulcer drugs (Fujii et al., 2012). The ventrolateral preoptic nucleus is a sleep-promoting nucleus located in the basal forebrain. A commonly used intravenous anesthetic, propofol, had been reported to induce sleep and augment the firing rate of neurons in ventrolateral GABAergic preoptic nucleus, but the underlining mechanism is yet to be clearly determined. Interestingly, the propofol-induced inhibition of inhibitory postsynaptic currents on noradrenalin-inhibite...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
How Bad Is Fentanyl? Fentanyl is an extremely dangerous synthetic opioid. Unlike some other opioids that occur naturally, it is man-made for the purpose of helping aid people suffering from extreme pain. It can be administered for recovery after surgery, during cancer treatments or for recovery after a painful injury. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) classifies fentanyl as a Schedule II controlled substance. This means that it is legal for medical use, however, it has an extremely high potential for abuse and addiction. Understanding Fentanyl Significantly stronger than morphine or oxycodone, Fentanyl can be fatal...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Heroin Painkiller Substance Abuse Synthetic fentanyl prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug detox prescription drug use p Source Type: blogs
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