Cognitive and behavioral status in Japanese ALS patients: a multicenter study

ConclusionsConsidering the high prevalence of in particular cognitive impairment, and the diversity of impairments, the cognitive and behavioral aspects of Japanese ALS patients should be given more attention clinically.
Source: Journal of Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research

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Testing for Alzheimer ’s disease and other forms of dementia is hardly foolproof, and could even backfire.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer ' s Disease Families and Family Life Memory Elderly Dementia Genetics and Heredity Anxiety and Stress Living Wills and Health Care Proxies Diet and Nutrition Depression (Mental) Frontotemporal Dementia Brain Nursing H Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: The association between Alzheimer's disease pathology and anxiety and apathy is partly due to impairment in cognitive functioning. PMID: 32088096 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Am J Geriatr Psychia... - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research
DiscussionWe hypothesize that caregivers in the screening arms will express higher levels of health-related quality of life, lower depressive and anxiety symptoms, and better preparation for caregiving with higher self-efficacy at 24  months. Results from this study will directly inform the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease, the USPSTF and other organizations regarding ADRD screening and early detection policies.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov,NCT03300180. Registered on 3 October.
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Publication date: Available online 15 February 2020Source: Neuroscience &Biobehavioral ReviewsAuthor(s): Filip Kosel, Jessica M.S. Pelley, Tamara B. FranklinAbstractTransgenic mouse models have been used extensively to model the cognitive impairments arising from Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-related pathology. However, less is known about the relationship between AD-related pathology and the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) commonly presented by patients. This review discusses the BPSD-like behaviours recapitulated by several mouse models of AD-related pathology, including the APP/PS1, Tg2576...
Source: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
You notice your loved one becoming more forgetful. She cannot recall her visit with her granddaughters yesterday. She claims she took her medications this morning, yet you find them untouched in her pill case. You wonder how this mild-mannered woman has become so angry, so quickly. She is often frightened now, disoriented, and unpredictable. Yet she still remembers every detail of your wedding day, the names of your four children, and how to play her favorite piano pieces. When you sing together, time temporarily stands still. Your loved one received a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Nights are the hardest time for...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Caregiving Healthy Aging Memory Source Type: blogs
dsuar Narcis Gusi Informal caregivers of persons with dementia often report high levels of anxiety, depression and burden. Nonetheless, other less evaluated psychological symptoms might also influence their health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The aim of this study was to comprehensively analyse other psychological symptoms and their influence on the health-related quality of life of informal caregivers. Fifty-four informal women caregivers and fifty-six women non-caregivers were recruited to participate in the study. Psychological symptoms were assessed using the Symptom Check-List-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) questionn...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Major Depression — the clinical type — is not a normal part of aging. Though it can appear at any age, older adults are at an increased risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) distinguishes this condition from having “the blues” and likens it to other medical illnesses that are treatable, like diabetes or hypertension. Overwhelming sadness and anxiety can last for weeks at a time or much longer, with a wide range of other discouraging symptoms. Yet, there are things that can help.  Statistics tell us that later in life, at least one chronic disease will affect 80 percent of u...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Aging Depression depression risk Elderly seniors Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsOur results indicate the prevalence of multiple comorbidities varies across the lifespan in DS, and in adults, rates for psychiatric comorbidities show different patterns for males and females relative to expected population rates. Further, most health comorbidities are not associated with poorer cognitive outcomes in DS, apart from autism and epilepsy. It is essential for clinicians to consider such differences to provide appropriate care and treatment for those with DS and to provide prognostic information relating to cognitive outcomes in those with comorbidities.
Source: Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The programs did not significantly decrease the outcomes measured. However, caregivers identified that inclusion at all stages during hospital admission was a vital factor to reduce stress and increase caregiver readiness. PMID: 31944506 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Australasian Journal on Ageing - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Australas J Ageing Source Type: research
With Christmas behind us and the winter months stretching out ahead, for many people this part of the year can feel particularly miserable — and most especially if they suffer with Seasonal Affective Disorder. While it’s crucial to head to the doctor if you are finding it difficult to cope, there are evidence-backed self-help methods to boost our mood during winter, which can help us to tackle the January blues and no longer feel as if life is on hold until Spring.  Stay Social It can be tempting to hide away in winter, and a variety of factors can make it difficult for people to socialize even if they wan...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness New Year's Self-Help Seasonal Affective Disorder Winter Blues Source Type: blogs
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