Polysomnographic assessment of suvorexant in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease dementia and insomnia: a randomized trial.

Polysomnographic assessment of suvorexant in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease dementia and insomnia: a randomized trial. Alzheimers Dement. 2020 Jan 15;: Authors: Herring WJ, Ceesay P, Snyder E, Bliwise D, Budd K, Hutzelmann J, Stevens J, Lines C, Michelson D Abstract INTRODUCTION: We evaluated the clinical profile of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant for treating insomnia in patients with mild-to-moderate probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia. METHODS: Randomized, double-blind, 4-week trial of suvorexant 10 mg (could be increased to 20 mg based on clinical response) or placebo in patients who met clinical diagnostic criteria for both probable AD dementia and insomnia. Sleep was assessed by overnight polysomnography in a sleep laboratory. The primary endpoint was change-from-baseline in polysomnography-derived total sleep time (TST) at week 4. RESULTS: Of 285 participants randomized (suvorexant, N = 142; placebo, N = 143), 277 (97%) completed the trial (suvorexant, N = 136; placebo, N = 141). At week 4, the model-based least squares mean improvement-from-baseline in TST was 73 minutes for suvorexant and 45 minutes for placebo; (difference = 28 minutes [95% confidence interval 11-45], p
Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimers Dement Source Type: research

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Source: Drugs - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 29, 2020 -- Suvorexant improves total sleep time (TST) in patients with probable Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia and insomnia, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in Alzheimer's&Dementia. W. Joseph Herring, M.D.,...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2019Source: Alzheimer's &DementiaAuthor(s): Alberto R. Ramos, Wassim Tarraf, Benson Wu, Susan Redline, Jianwen Cai, Martha L. Daviglus, Linda Gallo, Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Krista M. Perreira, Phyllis Zee, Donglin Zeng, Hector M. GonzalezAbstractIntroductionTo determine if sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep duration predict seven-year neurocognitive decline in US Hispanics/Latinos (N = 5247).MethodsThe exposures were baseline SDB, daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep duration. The outcomes were change in episodic learning ...
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD), which accounts for most of the dementia cases, is, aside from cognitive deterioration, often characterized by the presence of non-cognitive symptoms such as activity and sleep disturbances. AD patients typically experience increased sleep fragmentation, excessive daytime sleepiness and night-time insomnia. Here, we sought to investigate the link between sleep architecture, cognition and amyloid pathology in the APP23 amyloidosis mouse model for AD. By means of polysomnographic recordings the sleep-wake cycle of freely-moving APP23 and wild-type (WT) littermates of 3, 6 and 12 mon...
Source: Behavioural Brain Research - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Behav Brain Res Source Type: research
Conclusions: The use of antidepressants, especially SNRIs, was associated with a shorter survival time of sCJD patients. The possible changes in neurotransmitters should be emphasized. Scientifically, this study may provide insights into the mechanism of CJD. Clinically, it may contribute to the early diagnosis of CJD.IntroductionDepression is common in the elderly. Its prevalence rate is as high as 11.19%, and this increases progressively with worsening cognitive impairment (1). The presence of depression is an acknowledged risk factor for dementia (2); it can even double the risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (3, 4)...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: Lifestyle factors, such as physical activity, sleep, and social activity appear to be associated with cognitive function among older people. Physical activity and appropriate durations of sleep and conversation are important for cognitive function. Introduction Dementia is a major public health issue worldwide, with a serious burden for patients, caregivers, and society, as well as substantial economic impacts (1). Although the prevalence of late-life cognitive impairment and dementia are expected to increase in future, effective disease-modifying treatments are currently unavailable. Therefore, unders...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions Dysautonomic symptoms frequently occuring in α-synucleinopathies comprise cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, urogenital and thermoregulatory disturbances. These symptoms reduce quality of life and worsen prognosis. The understanding of their pathophysiology, as well as the detection of α-synuclein deposition and autonomic dysfunction in the premotor stages of α-synucleinopathies may be key for identifying novel treatment targets and improving clinical outcomes. While causative treatment is not yet available, improvement of quality of life can be achieved by personalized symptomatic treatment r...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Researchers here suggest a possible explanation for the observed association between disrupted sleep in later life and the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Sleep appears necessary to clear out tau produced during waking hours, and loss of sleep means raised levels of tau persist. The more tau in circulation, the more that an altered form of tau will be generated and aggregate into neurofibrillary tangles to damage brain cells. More research would be needed to quantify the size of this effect in comparison to, say, the contributions of lack of exercise or obesity. In the long run, however, one would hope ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 17 January 2019Source: The Lancet NeurologyAuthor(s): Michael R Irwin, Michael V VitielloSummaryNearly half of all adults older than 60 years of age report sleep disturbance, as characterised either by reports of insomnia complaints with daytime consequences, dissatisfaction with sleep quality or quantity, or the diagnosis of insomnia disorder. Accumulating evidence shows that sleep disturbance contributes to cognitive decline and might also increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease dementia by increasing β-amyloid burden. That sleep disturbance would be a candidate risk factor for Al...
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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