Guidelines on muscle relaxants and reversal in anaesthesia

ConclusionSubstantial agreement exists among experts regarding many strong recommendations for the improvement of practice concerning the use of muscle relaxants and reversal agents during anaesthesia. In particular, the French Society of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR) recommends the use of a device to monitor neuromuscular blockade throughout anaesthesia.
Source: Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research

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We report outcomes of our initial experience with LP in 38 children from 2 months of age. Materials and Methods From June 2015 to December 2017 38 children aged 2-60 months (mean age 1.7 years) underwent LP for correction of PUJ obstruction. The mean pre operative anteroposterior diameter of the renal pelvis (APD) was 43,5mm and all patients had hydronephrosis (APD 21.4-76 mm) and obstructed curve on diuretic renogram. Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty was the performed technique. Results are reported. Results Mean operative time was 107 minutes (70-180) with no conversion to open procedure. Pain control was needed mainly in the ...
Source: International Braz J Urol - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Mrs Havercampa presents to clinic at 4:00 pm today for an unscheduled appointment. She is a 67-year-old obese diabetic woman who is 10  days status post right common femoral endarterectomy with Dacron patch angioplasty and retrograde iliac stenting for rest pain. Today, she reports increasing pain and drainage from the groin wound. On examination, there is erythema and dehiscence of the skin edges. Cloudy fluid emanates from the w ound. I sigh. “Mrs Havercamp, when was the last time you had anything to eat or drink?”
Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Invited commentary Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: Surgery (Oxford)Author(s): Christopher Limb, Timothy RockallAbstractLaparoscopic surgery is currently established as the primary modality for many procedures. In has been associated with a number of benefits over traditional open surgery, including reduced pain, shorter hospital stay and quicker return to work. Despite this, significant operative challenges and the potential for life-threatening complications exist. Surgeons must understand the specialist equipment that is required, along with how to troubleshoot common issues. Furthermore, an appreciation of the d...
Source: Surgery (Oxford) - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Opioid consumption in North America has risen to alarming levels and represents a potentially modifiable risk factor in perioperative management. Chronic pain and obesity are commonly associated and bariatric surgery remains the most effective intervention for weight loss in morbidly obese patients. It is critical to understand how preoperative opioid use impacts surgical outcomes in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original articles Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the adoption of the surgical management of the morbidly obese patient. Although short term complication rates are higher with increasing obesity (II-III class), a majority of procedures can still be completed with minimally invasive approach. PMID: 32064825 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Minerva Ginecologica - Category: OBGYN Tags: Minerva Ginecol Source Type: research
This study aimed to provide an update on the association between MetS and OA and on the potential role of leptin in OA. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge of the association between MetS and OA and updated the evidence on the potential role of leptin in OA. Clinical studies have investigated the epidemiologic association between MetS or its components and OA. Results suggested strong epidemiologic associations between MetS and OA, especially in the Asian population. Animal studies also indicated that metabolic dysregulation may lead to OA pathogenesis. The systemic role of MetS in OA pathophysiology is ass...
Source: Cytokine - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Cytokine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: Anaesthesia Critical Care &Pain MedicineAuthor(s): Audrey De Jong, Amélie Rollé, François-Régis Souche, Olfa Yengui, Daniel Verzilli, Gérald Chanques, David Nocca, Emmanuel Futier, Samir JaberAbstractThe obese patient is at risk of perioperative complications including difficult airway access (intubation, difficult or impossible ventilation), and postextubation acute respiratory failure due to the formation of atelectases or to airway obstruction. The association of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSA) with obesity is very ...
Source: Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: Anaesthesia Critical Care &Pain MedicineAuthor(s): Maha MA Mostafa, Ahmed M Hasanin, Fatema Alhamade, Bassant Abdelhamid, Ahmed G Safina, Sahar M Kasem, Osama Hosny, Mohamed Mahmoud, Eman Fouad, Ashraf Rady, Sarah M Amin
Source: Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
ConclusionLaparoscopic cholecystostomy was effective in this obese patient with acute cholecystitis and NASH cirrhosis. Using a low-carbohydrate diet with exercise, her weight decreased, and subsequent open cholecystectomy was uneventful.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
AbstractThe terminology “gut-brain axis “points out a bidirectional relationship between the GI system and the central nervous system (CNS). To date, several researches have shown that migraine is associated with some gastrointestinal (GI) disorders such as Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection, irritable bowel syndrome ( IBS), and celiac disease (CD). The present review article aims to discuss the direct and indirect evidence suggesting relationships between migraine and the gut-brain axis. However, the mechanisms explaining how the gut and the brain may interact in patients with migraine are not entirely clear. ...
Source: The Journal of Headache and Pain - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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