The Role of Opioids in the Conundrum of Care for Persons in Pain

If we can say anything for certain about caring for persons in pain over the past decade is that it has prompted concern and confusion on how to provide the best care. Consider the following: Do we have an opioid epidemic or an opioid crisis in the United States? Does the difference in these words matter? What about the “other” less publicized public health crisis; chronic pain; where did that conversation go? Are opioid analgesics good or bad to treat people in pain? Should nurses be prepared in pain care, addiction care or both? What are the differences in state policies that govern and guide nursing practice around pain management? What is the best evidence to support opioid pain control in acute care? These are just a few questions that influence nurse's decision making and practice.
Source: Pain Management Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

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Our ability to feel pain and react to it is both a boon and a curse, simultaneously. The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) defines pain as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage.” This means that pain is highly subjective, and it is informed by a mix of past experiences, our current emotional state, and future expectations. Since pain is an emotional and sensory experience it affects our quality of life immensely, and treatment is complex. Chronic pain management with opioids is not ideal Opioids...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Mind body medicine Pain Management Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Safer prescribing policies may take multiple years to fully implement and need to be employed across the jurisdiction to minimize doctor-shopping and adverse effects on patients with chronic pain. Approaching pain management through the social-ecological model can address potential root causes of addiction and establish a framework for doctors to provide compassionate care, community leadership, and advocacy for these patients. PMID: 31790125 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: J Am Osteopath Assoc Source Type: research
Conclusion: This pilot study demonstrates that increasing residency education in managing chronic pain and opioid use disorder is feasible, and no longer needs to be postponed due to lack of time or faculty expertise. PMID: 31757179 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Substance Use and Misuse - Category: Addiction Tags: Subst Use Misuse Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Chronic pain serves as an important factor in the persistence of drug use in more than one-third of PWID in this sample. The high prevalence of chronic pain with drug use for pain suggests that proper pain management is likely to be an essential component of preventing or regressing injection drug use in PWID, with data needed on effective interventions for this population. PMID: 31704433 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Addictive Behaviors - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addict Behav Source Type: research
Depending on what you read, kratom is a dangerous, addictive drug with no medical utility and severe side effects, including overdose and death, or it is an accessible pathway out of undertreated chronic pain and opiate withdrawal. How can the US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), medical professionals, and millions of regular kratom users have such divergent views of the same plant? What is kratom? Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a tropical tree from the coffee family native to Southeast Asia, with properties that range from stimulant-like, energizing and uplifting, to opiate-like, causing drowsiness and euphoria. Kratom has d...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Pain Management Vitamins and supplements Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: The epidemic of opioid misuse has shown that there is a lack of fundamental knowledge about the characteristics and management of chronic pain, that conflicts of interest and validity of models must be more intensively considered in the context of drug development and that novel analgesics with less addictive potential are urgently needed. Currently, the most promising perspectives appear to be augmenting endogenous opioid actions and the selective activation of peripheral opioid receptors. PMID: 31222410 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Schmerz - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Schmerz Source Type: research
You're reading Options to Opioids: How to Manage Chronic Pain Without Prescribing Pain-Killers, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. While there is considerable debate as to how much blame doctors should be assigned for the ongoing opioid crisis, there is little doubt they can do something to curtail it -- that instead of prescribing drugs that have been found to be highly addictive they can resort to alternate forms of pain management. Doctors’ prescription of powerful painkillers like OxyContin is frequ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: health and fitness addiction health and wellness opioids self improvement Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: With approximately 100 million people suffering from both chronic and acute pain in the United States (US) in 2016, opiates will continue to remain a prominent class of medication in healthcare facilities and homes across the US. Over 66% of total overdose episodes in 2016 were opioid-related, a figure that attests to the severity and wide-spread nature of this issue. A three-point approach accentuating the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of both those currently affected and at-risk in the future may be the comprehensive solution.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Source Type: research
Current guidelines for addressing opioid cessation in the context of chronic pain management recommend that opioids be discontinued if the risks outweigh the benefits. However, few studies have focused on understanding opioid cessation from the perspective of individuals with chronic pain. This mixed-method study included 49 former opioid users with chronic pain and used quantitative survey data and qualitative focus group data to identify themes pertaining to former opioid user's experience before, during, and after opioid cessation. Participants described several reasons for wanting to stop opioids including lack of effi...
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Authors: Lee B, Sodhi N, Anis HK, Ehiorobo JO, Mont MA Abstract INTRODUCTION: There has been a rapid increase in opioid-related morbidity and mortality worldwide, and the dangers of excessive opioid use have been observed in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, including those diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis. Pain management is an important component of nonoperative treatment in knee osteoarthritis and frequently entails the use of opioids. However, this management technique is not without risks, such as addiction, morbidity, and mortality. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to review the existing l...
Source: Surgical Technology International - Category: Surgery Tags: Surg Technol Int Source Type: research
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