Exploratory analysis of a developmentally progressive modified ride-on car intervention for young children with Down syndrome.

Conclusions and Implications: The developmentally progressive nature of the intervention and high dosage may have been instrumental in encouraging the onset of independent activation and earlier motor milestones.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONYoung children with Down syndrome were able to achieve independent activation in seated and standing modified ride-on cars.Developmentally progressive modified ride-on car interventions may facilitate motor skill development, but future work utilizing a randomized control group is needed to examine the potential motor developmental benefits of the STS model and power-push mode.The developmentally progressive nature of the intervention may have been instrumental in encouraging the onset of independent switch activation in both seated and standing modes, as well as the high dosage and adherence rates compared to previous studies. PMID: 31939311 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation. Assistive Technology. - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol Source Type: research

Related Links:

Children with Down syndrome are known to have intellectual disability and a wide variety of malformations, such as congenital heart defects, small ears, small mouths, and other physical findings, along with medical conditions such as hypothyroidism, hip dislocation, hearing loss, cataracts, atlantoaxial instability, and leukemia. In 2011, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) updated its guidelines for health supervision of the child with Down syndrome to assist the pediatrician to care for the child with Down syndrome (https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/128/2/393).
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: The Editors' Perspectives Source Type: research
American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities,Volume 125, Issue 2, Page 90-92, March 2020.
Source: American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - Category: Disability Authors: Source Type: research
American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities,Volume 125, Issue 2, Page 93-96, March 2020.
Source: American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - Category: Disability Authors: Source Type: research
American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities,Volume 125, Issue 2, Page 97-99, March 2020.
Source: American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - Category: Disability Authors: Source Type: research
American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities,Volume 125, Issue 2, Page 100-102, March 2020.
Source: American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - Category: Disability Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions for PracticeMothers of young children with developmental disabilities may have poorer health than those with typically developing children. Research is needed to identify whether the relationship is causal and, if so, interventions that could reduce the negative effect of caregiving.
Source: Maternal and Child Health Journal - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
Authors: Shea M Abstract This paper explores the relationship between disability and quality of life and some of its implications for bioethics and healthcare. It focuses on the neglected perfectionist approach that ties well-being to the flourishing of human nature, which provides the strongest support for the common view of disability as a harm. After critiquing the traditional Aristotelian version of perfectionism, which excludes the disabled from flourishing by prioritizing rationalistic goods, I defend a new version that prioritizes the social capacities of human nature and the goods of personal relationship. ...
Source: Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal - Category: Medical Ethics Tags: Kennedy Inst Ethics J Source Type: research
Contributors : Jan T Czerminski ; Jeanne B LawrenceSeries Type : Expression profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Homo sapiensAlthough Down Syndrome (DS) is the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability in children, the developmental pathogenesis remains largely unknown, and better strategies are needed to investigate this. We previously showed that one copy of chromosome 21 can be epigenetically silenced in DS iPSCs by insertion of an XIST transgene, which produces a non-coding RNA that normally silences one X chromosome in female cells. XIST was shown to induce heterochromatin and silence transcription...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Source Type: research
Contributors : Jan T Czerminski ; Jeanne B LawrenceSeries Type : Expression profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Homo sapiensAlthough Down Syndrome (DS) is the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability in children, the developmental pathogenesis remains largely unknown, and better strategies are needed to investigate this. We previously showed that one copy of chromosome 21 can be epigenetically silenced in DS iPSCs by insertion of an XIST transgene, which produces a non-coding RNA that normally silences one X chromosome in female cells. XIST was shown to induce heterochromatin and silence transcription...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur results indicate the prevalence of multiple comorbidities varies across the lifespan in DS, and in adults, rates for psychiatric comorbidities show different patterns for males and females relative to expected population rates. Further, most health comorbidities are not associated with poorer cognitive outcomes in DS, apart from autism and epilepsy. It is essential for clinicians to consider such differences to provide appropriate care and treatment for those with DS and to provide prognostic information relating to cognitive outcomes in those with comorbidities.
Source: Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
More News: Child Development | Children | Disability | Down's Syndrome | Rehabilitation | Study | Training | Universities & Medical Training