Novel Coronavirus – Japan (ex-China)

The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, today informed the World Health Organization (WHO) of a confirmed case of a novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) in a person who travelled to Wuhan, China. This is the second confirmed case of 2019-nCoV that has been detected outside of China, following confirmation of a case in Thailand on 13 January. Considering global travel patterns, additional cases in other countries are likely. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. 2019-nCoV is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

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Source: BMJ News - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Source: BMJ - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial ResistanceAuthor(s): Zhenwei Yu, Lingyan Yu, Jianping Zhu
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
People wear face masks in the waiting area at China's Shenzhen Bao'an International Airport. Credit: UN News/Jing ZhangBy Fairuz AhmedNEW YORK, Feb 3 2020 (IPS) We are now living in a hyper communicative world where news does travel faster than lightning. Boundaries, borders, geographical and time differences have become next to obsolete in today’s speed driven world. At any point in time people, news and local occurrences can influence internationally without much local isolation. Along with the advantages of technology, communications and connections world is also facing new challenges that are proportionally evolv...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Asia-Pacific Economy & Trade Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Population TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
The year of the rat is off to an ominous start. “We just stay home and don’t go out,” says Mr. Dong. The 33-year-old researcher, who provided only one name, has no other options. He, his wife and their 3-month-old daughter live in Wuhan, the epicenter of an unfolding global health crisis. They’re treating the forced time at home as a holiday, though he says, “this is different than any of them before.” Families like his huddle in their homes, fearful that if they venture out, they will get sick. Since the first cases of a previously unknown pneumonia-like illness emerged in December, Wuh...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Cases of a novel pneumonia-like illness that originated in Wuhan, China in December have now been confirmed in South Korea, Thailand, Japan, Taiwan, Macau—and, as of Jan. 21, the U.S. The virus’ geographic reach, as well as its newly discovered ability to spread via person-to-person contact, has health officials worried about the prospect of globals spread. As health officials scramble to learn more about the virus and is origins, researchers are simultaneously turning to the question of how to develop a vaccine or therapy that could help contain transmission worldwide—a feat that experts say is technical...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease Source Type: news
BOSTON (CBS/CNN) – A new Chinese coronavirus, a cousin of the SARS virus, has infected more than 200 people since the outbreak began in Wuhan, China, in December. Boston’s Logan Airport is not currently screening passengers for the illness, a spokesman for Customs and Border Protection told WBZ-TV. That’s because there are no direct flights to Boston from that region. Additional health screening for coronavirus is in place at JFK Airport in New York, San Francisco International Airport and Los Angeles International Airport. The agency said the CDC has determined that coronavirus presents a low risk to the...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Coronavirus Logan Airport Source Type: news
Abstract Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) were first described in the 1960s for patients with the common cold. Since then, more HCoVs have been discovered, including those that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), two pathogens that, upon infection, can cause fatal respiratory disease in humans. It was recently discovered that dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia harbor three different HCoV species, including a dominant MERS HCoV lineage that was responsible for the outbreaks in the Middle East and South Korea during 2015. In this review we aim to compare and contrast ...
Source: Trends in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Trends Microbiol Source Type: research
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) -- Saudi authorities closed an emergency ward in one of the kingdom's largest hospitals after at least 46 people, including hospital staff, contracted the potentially fatal Middle East respiratory syndrome, also known as MERS, a health official said Wednesday. Dr. Hanan Balkhi of the Health Ministry's department for infectious diseases said that of the 46 people infected at King Abdulaziz Medical City in the capital, Riyadh, 15 were medical staff. Another 20 people showing symptoms are being tested, she added. The patients from the ward, set to remain closed for two weeks, are being transferred to...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea believes its MERS virus outbreak may have peaked, and experts say the next several days will be critical to determining whether the government's belated efforts have successfully stymied a disease that has killed seven people and infected nearly 100 in the country. The biggest outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome outside the region where it was first seen in 2012 was introduced to South Korea last month by a 68-year-old man who had traveled to Saudi Arabia and other nearby countries. When he got sick after his return to South Korea, he visited several hospitals and clin...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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