Graphene quantum dots redefine nanobiomedicine

Publication date: May 2020Source: Materials Science and Engineering: C, Volume 110Author(s): T.K. Henna, K. PramodAbstractCarbon-based nanomaterials have established a prime position as drug delivery carriers. It is very interesting to see that a carbon nanostructure could be used as a drug too, instead of its regular application as a drug delivery carrier. In this aspect, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are now in the spotlight. GQDs are one of the recent entrants to the list of carbon-based nanomaterials. They are now reported useful in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Furthermore, antibacterial and anti-diabetic potentials of GQDs are now known. In addition, they are now widely evaluated for drug delivery application. They have good potential for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier. Tumor-targeted drug delivery is also possible with GQDs. Their biosensing and bioimaging applications are also under extensive study. In this review, the therapeutic, drug delivery, biosensing and bioimaging applications of GQDs are described. It would be very interesting to speculate the future of GQDs and how this carbon nanomaterial influences the future of nanobiomedicine. It is presumed that drug-GQD duo would be the next generation strategy for many unresolved therapeutic hurdles.Graphical abstract
Source: Materials Science and Engineering: C - Category: Materials Science Source Type: research

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Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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