Neonatal hyperoxia exposure induces aortic biomechanical alterations and cardiac dysfunction in juvenile rats

Prolonged neonatal oxygen exposure causes persistent aortic structural and biomechanical alterations, which was even more pronounced after recovery in normoxia. This was accompanied by a marked impairment in left ventricular function. These findings have important implications as it suggests that premature babies exposed to oxygen may be predisposed to vascular dysfunction, leading to increased risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. As this affected population begins to age, there will be a critical need to identify the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms for these vascular morbidities in preterm survivors. AbstractSupplemental oxygen (O2) therapy in preterm infants impairs lung development, but the impact of O2 on long ‐term systemic vascular structure and function has not been well‐explored. The present study tested the hypothesis that neonatal O2 therapy induces long ‐term structural and functional alterations in the systemic vasculature, resulting in vascular stiffness observed in children and young adults born preterm. Newborn Sprague‐Dawley rats were exposed to normoxia (21% O2) or hyperoxia (85% O2) for 1 and 3  weeks. A subgroup exposed to 3 weeks hyperoxia was recovered in normoxia for an additional 3 weeks. Aortic stiffness was assessed by pulse wave velocity (PWV) using Doppler ultrasound and pressure myography. Aorta remodeling was assessed by collagen deposition and expression. Left ventricular (L V) function was assessed by ech...
Source: Physiological Reports - Category: Physiology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research

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BOSTON (CBS) — Imagine giving birth to a premature baby and then being told you have a brain tumor. That’s what happened to a woman from Holden. But thanks to a new approach at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, this new mom was able to have brain surgery and quickly return to her newborn son. At 27 weeks pregnant, Bethany Shea was diagnosed with preeclampsia and had an emergency C-section. Then she went blind. “It was a pregnancy complication due to my high blood pressure,” Bethany explained. Bethany regained her vision, but worried she had had a stroke, doctors ordered an MRI. But instead of a st...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Brigham and Women's Hospital Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news
Mind-reading exoskeletons, digital tattoos, 3D printed drugs, RFID implants for recreational purposes: mindblowing innovations come to medicine and healthcare almost every single day. We shortlisted some of the greatest ideas and developments that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine, but we found so many that we had trouble fitting them into one article. Here are the first ten spectacular medical innovations to watch for. 1) Mixed reality opens new ways for medical education Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality are all technologies opening new worlds for the human senses. While the difference between...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing artificial food brain-computer interface cyborg digital tattoos drug development exoskeleton gamification google glass health insurance Healthcare Innovation List Medical education medical techn Source Type: blogs
This study was hypothesis-driven; the genetic variants were selected for being previously and substantially genotyped. The big sample size and the rich panel of other biomarkers allowed the authors to conduct much more detailed analyses on this topic. The third article by Provenzi et al. proposed their perspectives on the role of telomeres in premature birth and discussed the potential implications for early adversity and care in the neonatal intensive care unit (Pavanello et al.). Indeed, the speculation of telomeres in aging begins in the premature aging syndrome. It is thus interesting to examine if telomeres also play...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Tiny wireless skin sensors are being tested to monitor stroke recovery and breathing disorders, but they could also help babies who are born prematurely, according to a new study in the journal Science. The skin-like silicon patches attach to the chest and foot proved just as reliable as traditional electrodes for tracking babies' heart and respiration rates, temperature, blood pressure and blood-oxygen level. Dr. Jon LaPook reports.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest risk for deficits in encoding of new verbal information following bilateral thalamic stroke in adolescence, as well as risk for persistent cognitive deficits despite initial improvements. This is consistent with descriptions of anterograde memory impairments in adults with similar lesions. PMID: 30472911 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Clinical Neuropsychologist - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Clin Neuropsychol Source Type: research
What if markings on your skin could unlock your phone or get you access to entrance doors? And what if they could also measure your blood pressure or hydration level constantly in the background only alerting you in case of values out of the normal range? Digital tattoos could act as minilabs rendering our skin an interactive display and making healthcare more invisible at the same time. Here’s our summary of the latest trends and research efforts to make it happen. Our bodies are the next frontier for technology In the course of the development of medical devices, a general trend has emerged: tools are getting more...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Business Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Medical Professionals Patients digital digital health digital tattoo digital tattoos future Innovation Personalized medicine technology wearables Source Type: blogs
You're reading 10 Ways Chronic Stress Is Killing Your Quality Of Life, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Stress is something which is almost unavoidable in modern life. While the right amount of stress motivates individual performance, it is necessary if you could distinguish whether your stress is good or chronic. Chronic stress derives from repeated interaction of the body to intense and stressful situations, contributing to the release of stress hormone. The stress is troublesome when it comes to chronic,...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: depression featured self improvement anxiety bad habits chronic stress Source Type: blogs
“Summer means happy times and good sunshine. It means going to the beach, going to Disneyland, having fun.” – Brian Wilson “Summertime, and the livin’ is easy…” Great lyrics by George Gershwin from the classic song he wrote for the 1935 musical Porgy and Bess. Summertime should be a time for individuals, families and friends to spend together doing what makes them laugh, enjoy each other’s’ company, and contribute to everyone’s overall well-being. In the middle of vacation or weekend getaway planning, or just carving time out of your busy schedule for some fun ac...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Habits Happiness Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to demonstrate benefit or harm of using anticoagulants with or without ASA versus ASA alone in people with aPL antibodies and a history of recurrent pregnancy loss and with no such history; ASA versus placebo in people with aPL antibodies; and ASA with LMWH versus placebo or IVIG, and ASA with high-dose LMWH versus ASA with low-dose LMWH or UFH, in women with aPL antibodies and a history of recurrent pregnancy loss, for the primary prevention of thrombotic events. In a mixed population of people with a history of previous pregnancy loss and without such a history treated with ant...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Young adults born preterm demonstrate early pulmonary vascular disease, characterized by elevated pulmonary pressures, a stiffer pulmonary vascular bed, and right ventricular dysfunction, consistent with an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. PMID: 29944842 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Respir Crit Care Med Source Type: research
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