Three Evidence-Based Ways to Feel Better During Winter  

With Christmas behind us and the winter months stretching out ahead, for many people this part of the year can feel particularly miserable — and most especially if they suffer with Seasonal Affective Disorder. While it’s crucial to head to the doctor if you are finding it difficult to cope, there are evidence-backed self-help methods to boost our mood during winter, which can help us to tackle the January blues and no longer feel as if life is on hold until Spring.  Stay Social It can be tempting to hide away in winter, and a variety of factors can make it difficult for people to socialize even if they want to. However, research shows that lack of social interaction can be as bad for people as smoking, while socializing with others can have a variety of benefits for our physical and mental health — even lowering our risk of dementia.  Joining art or exercise classes, hobby groups or even making a point of meeting with friends every week can help us to combat social isolation during winter, while volunteering has even greater benefits. Altruistic activities increase our happiness while also doing good for the wider community, with 94% of volunteers reporting that helping others improves their mood.  Keep Active Exercise may not be at the top of our list of things we want to do in winter, but there is significant evidence to suggest that it can make us happier as well as healthier. A study published in JAMA Psychiatry saw a 26% decrease in odds ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness New Year's Self-Help Seasonal Affective Disorder Winter Blues Source Type: blogs

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