A lifeline for premature born babies: Funding announced for new stem cell research

(RMIT University) A new therapy being developed by a group of researchers from across the globe aims to see if stem cells can be used to regenerate the brain damage caused by premature birth. This brain damage is called 'encephalopathy of prematurity' (EOP). The European research project, which is called PREMSTEM, has received € 9M in funding from the European Union's prestigious Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation programme.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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This study highlights the potential benefit of using iPSCs to repair damaged lung tissue through possible modulation of the inflammatory response, leading to novel therapies for acute hyperoxia-induced lung injury and the prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. PMID: 32051754 [PubMed]
Source: American Journal of Translational Research - Category: Research Tags: Am J Transl Res Source Type: research
Debate needed over research with ‘potential for something to suffer’, neuroscientists sayNeuroscientists may have crossed an “ethical rubicon” by growing lumps of human brain in the lab, and in some cases transplanting the tissue into animals, researchers warn.The creation of mini-brains or brain “organoids” has become one of the hottest fields in modern neuroscience. The blobs of tissue are made from stem cells and, while they are only the size of a pea, some have developed spontaneous brain waves,similar to those seen in premature babies.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Neuroscience Ethics World news Medical research Source Type: news
Mind-reading exoskeletons, digital tattoos, 3D printed drugs, RFID implants for recreational purposes: mindblowing innovations come to medicine and healthcare almost every single day. We shortlisted some of the greatest ideas and developments that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine, but we found so many that we had trouble fitting them into one article. Here are the first ten spectacular medical innovations to watch for. 1) Mixed reality opens new ways for medical education Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality are all technologies opening new worlds for the human senses. While the difference between...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing artificial food brain-computer interface cyborg digital tattoos drug development exoskeleton gamification google glass health insurance Healthcare Innovation List Medical education medical techn Source Type: blogs
Credit: Chris McCulloh. Chris McCulloh Job: 4th-year general surgical resident, Morristown Medical Center in New Jersey Grew up in: Manhattan When not at work, he’s: Programming, coding, thinking about artificial intelligence, and machine learning Hobbies: Writing/producing electronic music, weightlifting Ten years ago, Chris McCulloh planned to enter medical school and fulfill his dream of becoming a surgeon. Instead, just months before he was to start med school, he ended up a patient. A freak accident—slipping on a hardwood floor, flying backwards, and landing neck-first on the edge of a glass coffee tabl...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Being a Scientist Stem Cells Training Source Type: blogs
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown promise as therapeutic agents in treating morbidities associated with premature birth. MSCs derived from the human umbilical cord are easy to isolate and have low immunogenicity and a robust ability to secrete paracrine factors. To date, there are no studies evaluating preterm versus term umbilical cord tissue-derived MSCs. Therefore, our aim was twofold: (1) to compare stem cell properties in preterm versus term MSCs and (2) to examine the impact of oxygen tension on stem cell behavior. Umbilical cord tissue was obtained from 5 preterm and 5 term neonates. The cells were isolated a...
Source: Cells Tissues Organs - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Author Affiliations open 1Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Environmental Science and Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China 2Center on Clinical and Epidemiological Eye Research, Affiliated Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China 3Center on the Early Life Origins of Disease, Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA 4Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA 5Channing ...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusion This study aimed to see whether smoking in pregnancy is linked with some traits of ASD in the smoker's grandchildren. Although this was based on a large cohort of children, the results give quite a confusing and inconclusive picture. To be frank, the study raised more questions than it answered. Maternal grandmother smoking was linked with ASD traits only in girls (in whom ASD is less common in any case) – and then only if their own mother did not smoke. When looking at actual diagnosed cases of autism, the link was only found in boys. The study had some important limitations to consider: Most of the dat...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Neurology Mental health Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news
Abstract In vitro human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) derived tissues are excellent models to study certain aspects of normal human development. Current research in the field of hPSC derived tissues reveals these models to be inherently fetal-like on both a morphological and gene expression level. In this review we briefly discuss current methods for differentiating lung and intestinal tissue from hPSCs into individual 3-dimensional units called organoids. We discuss how these methods mirror what is known about in vivo signaling pathways of the developing embryo. Additionally, we will review how the inherent immatu...
Source: Developmental Biology - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Dev Biol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 March 2016 Source:Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology Author(s): Dragos Cretoiu, Sanda Maria Cretoiu Over the past decades, we were witnessing spectacular molecular medicine advances. However, many of the reproductive medicine problems, such as fertility issues and premature birth still represent major challenges for obstetrics & gynecology worldwide. A new cell population − the telocytes (TCs) − were described in the interstitial space of many organs, and their possible implications in many important physiological and pathological processes should not be o...
Source: Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Stem cells in babies' urine seem to help regenerate kidney tissue, protecting it from toxic drugs and could pep up organs for transplantation
Source: New Scientist - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research
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