Heart Transplants From Donors With Hepatitis C May Be Safe: Study

Title: Heart Transplants From Donors With Hepatitis C May Be Safe: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 1/13/2020 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/14/2020 12:00:00 AM
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

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THE UNITED Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) adopted the label “high risk” from the Public Health Service (PHS) in 2004 in order to improve organ safety by reducing disease transmission. This has resulted in nonutilization of organs from patients who are otherwise healthy but deemed high risk because of social behaviors or illicit drug use. Organ availabili ty remains the limiting factor to organ transplantation, and the number of patients awaiting transplantation is outpacing the number of transplantations being performed.
Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8, 2020 -- Adult heart transplants from hepatitis C virus-positive (HCV+) donors appear safe, with no increased risk for adverse effects on one-year survival, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of the...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
(American Heart Association) One-year survival was 90% for adults with severe heart failure who received a heart transplant from a donor with hepatitis C, which was nearly identical to those who received a heart from donors who did not have hepatitis C (91%). Rates of organ rejection, stroke and kidney dialysis were similar between the two groups. More research is needed to assess longer-term results, however, increased use of hearts from donors with hepatitis C could help overcome the national shortage of donor organs.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
(JAMA Network) Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., report in this case series on 80 patients who had heart transplants using hearts from donors positive for hepatitis C.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
An unprecedented number of heart transplants were performed in the United States during 2016,1 yet 15% of patients on the waitlist either died or became too sick for transplant.2 Wait times remain unacceptably high for heart transplant candidates. As a result, there has been growing interest in the development of innovative strategies to mitigate the donor organ shortage. During the past decade, the opioid epidemic in the United States has led to a dramatic increase in the number of organ donors who died as a result of drug intoxication.
Source: The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Invited Expert Opinion Source Type: research
National data demonstrate that increasing opportunities exist for organ donation among hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected individuals.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Clinical Science Source Type: research
National data demonstrate that increasing opportunities exist for organ donation among hepatitis C virus (HCV) –infected individuals.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL CLINICAL SCIENCE Source Type: research
In conclusion, our data show how oncogenic and tumor-suppressive drivers of cellular senescence act to regulate surveillance processes that can be circumvented to enable SnCs to elude immune recognition but can be reversed by cell surface-targeted interventions to purge the SnCs that persist in vitro and in patients. Since eliminating SnCs can prevent tumor progression, delay the onset of degenerative diseases, and restore fitness; since NKG2D-Ls are not widely expressed in healthy human tissues and NKG2D-L shedding is an evasion mechanism also employed by tumor cells; and since increasing numbers of B cells express NKG2D ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Previous studies suggest that direct-acting anti-virals (DAAs) for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection permits the transplantation of HCV-viremic donor organs in uninfected recipients. This opportunity may expand the donor pool. We assessed the impact of using HCV nucleic acid test –positive (NAT+) donor hearts on heart transplant (HTx) waitlist time and transplant rate.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL CLINICAL SCIENCE Source Type: research
Previous studies suggest that direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection permits transplantation of HCV-viremic donor organs in uninfected recipients. This opportunity may expand donor pool. We assessed the impact of utilizing HCV nucleic acid test-positive (NAT+) donor hearts on heart transplant (HTx) waitlist time and transplant rate.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Clinical Science Source Type: research
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