The Oral Microbiota May Have Influence on Oral Cancer

The oral microbiota plays an important role in the human microbiome and human health, and imbalances between microbes and their hosts can lead to oral and systemic diseases and chronic inflammation, which is usually caused by bacteria and contributes to cancer. There may be a relationship between oral bacteria and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC); however, this relationship has not been thoroughly characterized. Therefore, in this study, we compared the microbiota compositions between tumor sites and opposite normal tissues in buccal mucosal of 50 patients with OSCC using the 16S rDNA sequencing. Richness and diversity of bacteria were significantly higher in tumor sites than in the control tissues. Cancer tissues were enriched in six families (Prevotellaceae, Fusobacteriaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Peptostreptococcaceae, and Campylobacteraceae) and 13 genera, including Fusobacterium, Alloprevotella and Porphyromonas. At the species level, the abundances of Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia, Aggregatibacter segnis, Capnocytophaga leadbetteri, Peptostreptococcus stomatis, and another five species were significantly increased, suggesting a potential association between these bacteria and OSCC. Furthermore, the functional prediction revealed that genes involved in bacterial chemotaxis, flagellar assembly and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis which are associated with various pathological processes, were significantly increased in the OSCC group....
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research

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Source: BMJ Comments - Category: General Medicine Source Type: forums
ConclusionHCV core and IL-22 and SOCS-3 molecules are found to be correlated statistically under this study. Concluded from this study that HCV core protein plays a potential role in diverging the hepatocytes from normal to carcinogenic. One cell signaling path cannot decide, the direct role of a single viral protein in developing viral induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Interpreting the complex network of cell signaling involved in HCC development is impractical to study under single study. That is why step by step unmasking the interactive role of few molecules under single study is the ideal way to resolve the impact of vira...
Source: Microbial Pathogenesis - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe CAUTI incidence is reduced through QCC, providing a useful reference for the prevention of CAUTI and the development of medical quality improvement activities.
Source: American Journal of Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
In this study, we found that Lnc-OC1 was significantly higher in PCOS granulosa cells (GCs) compared to non-PCOS GCs. Lnc-OC1 knockdown inhibited cell viability and promoted cell apoptosis, expression of aromatase mRNA and production of estradiol in KGN cells. In PCOS mice, Lnc-OC1 promoted the serum insulin release, production of angiogenesis-related factors and IκBα phosphorylation, which could be partially restored by Lnc-OC1 shRNA. These results suggest that Lnc-OC1 plays an important part in the pathogenesis of PCOS.
Source: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Saliva microbiota diversity and composition were significantly associated with body size and gender in Finnish children. Body size–specific saliva microbiota profiles open new avenues for studying the potential roles of microbiota in weight development and management. Introduction The composition and diversity of the human microbiota may be an important factor in health and disease (Cho and Blaser, 2012). Several studies have proposed that changes in the human gut microbiota may alter pathogenic mechanisms, which are associated with the development of obesity and insulin resistance (Musso et al., ...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
This study revealed that there might be a close relationship between oral microorganisms, particularly periodontal pathogens, and OSCC, which might enrich the pathogenesis of oral squamous carcinoma. PMID: 30470868 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Appl Microbiol Biotechnol Source Type: research
Authors: Yamamura K, Baba Y, Miyake K, Nakamura K, Shigaki H, Mima K, Kurashige J, Ishimoto T, Iwatsuki M, Sakamoto Y, Yamashita Y, Yoshida N, Watanabe M, Baba H Abstract The human microbiome Fusobacterium nucleatum, which primarily inhabits the oral cavity, causes periodontal disease and has also been implicated in the development of colorectal cancer. However, whether F. nucleatum is present in other gastroenterological cancer tissues remains to be elucidated. The present study evaluated whether quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were able to detect F. nucleatum DNA and measure the quantity of F...
Source: Oncology Letters - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncol Lett Source Type: research
Authors: Perera M, Al-Hebshi NN, Speicher DJ, Perera I, Johnson NW Abstract Oral cancer, primarily oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), continues to be a major global health problem with high incidence and low survival rates. While the major risk factors for this malignancy, mostly lifestyle related, have been identified, around 15% of oral cancer cases remain unexplained. In light of evidence implicating bacteria in the aetiology of some cancer types, several epidemiological studies have been conducted in the last decade, employing methodologies ranging from traditional culture techniques to 16S rRNA metagenomics,...
Source: Journal of Oral Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Tags: J Oral Microbiol Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2016 Source:Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, Volume 84 Author(s): Pourya Gholizadeh, Hosein Eslami, Mehdi Yousefi, Mohammad Asgharzadeh, Mohammad Aghazadeh, Hossein Samadi Kafil The oral cavity is inhibited by many of the bacterial species. Some of them have a key role in the development of oral disease. Interrelationships between oral microbiome and systemic conditions such as head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Emerging evidence also suggests a link between periodontal disease and oral cancer, and the explanation being that chronic inflammation could be...
Source: Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: Cellular Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
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