Epidermodysplasia verruciformis associated with HPV 10.

Epidermodysplasia verruciformis associated with HPV 10. Dermatol Online J. 2013;19(4):18170 Authors: Zahir A, Craig L, Rady P, Tyring S, Ehrlich A Abstract Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare, inherited dermatologic condition demonstrating an increased susceptibility to specific HPV genotypes, resulting in both benign and malignant skin lesions. Epidermodysplasia verruciformis lesions are frequently described as pityriasis versicolor-like scaly macules, flat wart-like papules, or verrucous and seborrhic keratosis-like papules and plaques. Acquired EV has been described in patients with HIV and in those who are on immunosuppressive therapy. We discuss a patient with congenital EV who presents with skin lesions associated with HPV 10, a less frequently cited causative subtype, and histological findings that are not classic for EV. PMID: 24021362 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Dermatol Online J - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Dermatol Online J Source Type: research

Related Links:

Pityriasis versicolor (PV) is a common chronic superficial fungal infection of the skin caused by an unusual increased proliferation of Malassezia species in the stratum corneum layer of skin. Malassezia is a yeast that is part of the skin ’s habitual flora and it acquires a pathogenic potential when assuming the mycelial form under the influence of trigger factors including, humidity, immunosuppression, and hyperhidrosis. Systemic therapies are recommended for severe or recalcitrant cases, but they could come with important side ef fects and drug interactions.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Photobiology and Pigmentation Source Type: research
PRP is an extremely rare inflammatory skin disorder characterized by scaly salmon-colored lesions that can cover the entire body. While the underlying cause of PRP is unknown, it displays overlapping clinical features with psoriasis, making diagnosis challenging. Some cases can spontaneously resolve but the clinical management of chronic cases is hindered by the lack of effective therapies. To shed light on the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of PRP, RNAseq was used to characterize dermal and epidermal transcriptomes of PRP and healthy skin.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Innate Immunity and Inflammation Source Type: research
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a highly prevalent chronic inflammatory skin disease that is known to be, at least in part, genetically determined. Mutations in caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 14 (CARD14) have been shown to result in various forms of psoriasis and pityriasis rubra pilaris. In this research project, we aimed to identify rare DNA variants conferring a significant risk for AD through genetic and functional studies in a cohort of patients affected with severe AD. Whole exome and direct gene sequencing revealed in 4 patients from three families, 2 rare heterozygous missense mutations in the gene encodin...
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Innate Immunity and Inflammation Source Type: research
Pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) is a rare chronic inflammatory skin disorder clinically characterized by keratotic follicular papules, well-demarcated scaly erythematous plaques interspersed with distinct islands of uninvolved skin, and palmoplantar keratoderma. The autosomal dominant subtype, which is classified as PRP type V (PRPV), is associated with gain-of-function mutations in CARD14. Although around 30 cases with PRPV have been reported in the literature, diagnosis and treatment remain difficult.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Genetics and Cell Based Therapy Source Type: research
Background: Pityriasis versicolor (PV) is a superficial mycosis caused by malassezia yeast, which is a lipophilic fungus. Lesions may be of hypopigmented, hyperpigmented, or mixed varant. Low sensitivity and specificity of KOH examination poses a diagnostic challenge in difficult cases where dermoscopy can be a useful aid.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
This study was done to compare the clinical and the laboratory characteristics of patients diagnosed with atypical PR and patients diagnosed with typical PR. We retrospectively reviewed 162 patients (71 males, 91 females; mean age, 33.0 years) diagnosed with PR through clinical manifestations and skin biopsies from 2006 to 2018 in Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Introduction: Capillary leak syndrome (CLS) is caused by capillary hyperpermeability resulting in a shift of fluid and protein into the interstitial space. Symptoms consist of localized or diffuse skin edema, weight gain, renal failure and hypovolemic shock. CLS may be idiopathic, associated with cutaneous disease or drug induced. Few cases of CLS induced by acitretin have been reported to date.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) is a rare cutaneous papulosquamous inflammatory disease which often fails to respond to conventional therapies. The off-label use of adalimumab for the treatment of PRP, have been shown to be effective in case series and case reports. In a recent literature review on the treatment of PRP with biological agents, a total of 20 patients treated with adalimumab were found. These patients were all refractory to other therapies and adalimumab was administered subcutaneously (sc) at the dose of 80 mg at week 0 and then 40 mg twice monthly for several weeks to a few months in most cases.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
We report a case of pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC) induced by adalimumab in a patient being treated for hidradenitis suppurativa (HS).
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
A 7-year-old Fitzpatrick skin type IV male presented to the dermatology clinic with his mother with a seven month hx of nail changes and a mildly pruritic rash over the dorsal hands. A previous clinical visit 3 months earlier showed a negative KOH of his skin lesions and negative fungal culture of his nail clippings. The initial differential diagnosis included pachyonychia congenita, psoriasis, and tinea unguium, along with tinea corporis. On the subsequent exam, a waxy, orange palmoplantar keratoderma was noted, along with subungual hyperkeratosis and onycholysis.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
More News: Cancer & Oncology | Dermatology | Pityriasis | Skin