The performance of the World Rugby Head Injury Assessment Screening Tool: a diagnostic accuracy study - Fuller GW, Tucker R, Starling L, Falvey E, Douglas M, Raftery M.

BACKGROUND: Off-field screening tools, such as the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT), have been recommended to identify possible concussion following a head impact where the consequences are unclear. However, real-life performance, and diagnostic ac...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Related Links:

Tozuda, a company based in Philadelphia, has developed a head impact sensor that can be attached to a sports helmet, such as those worn by football or hockey players, and which will indicate if a dangerous impact has occurred. The sensor undergoes a ...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Neurology Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs
Quanterix has reached another step in its goal to advance a blood-based test to detect concussions in athletes. The Billerica, MA-based company said researchers have successfully applied the Single Molecule Array (Simoa) technology to generate data on the value of blood biomarkers as research tools to study pathophysiological mechanisms of concussion and as potential clinical tools and objective indicators for sports-related concussions (SRCs) and mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs). Results have been published in JAMA Network Open, demonstrate the promise of blood biomarkers to serve as clinical tools for objectively id...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business Source Type: news
To the Editor Nelson et al state that the term mild in mild traumatic brain injury misrepresents the burden of traumatic brain injury. Seminal prospective controlled studies by 3 of Nelson ’s own coauthors, who are neuropsychologists, that date back to the 1980s contradict the findings of this article. To my knowledge, Levin et al were the first to conclusively show that a single uncomplicated mild head injury produces no permanent neurobehavioral impairment. A Glasgow Coma Scale sc ore of 13 to 15 and a coma not to exceed 20 minutes was introduced earlier as a definition of mild head injury. Levin et al added normal...
Source: JAMA Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ConclusionsHead injuries remain a rare event. There has been a decline in the severity of reported head injuries which may be a function of a decline in the proportion of snowboarders in snowsports.
Source: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
The diagnosis of concussion remains challenging, particularly in cases where several months have passed between a head injury and clinical assessment. Tracking multiple moving objects in three-dimensional (3D) space engages many of the same cognitive proce...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
Patients should seek specialty care, including targeted treatments for specific symptoms, as soon as possible after head injury, the author of a new study says.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news
A 49-year-old female with history of daily inhaled corticosteroid use for asthma presented to a concussion clinic 7 wk after sport-related head injury with headache, visual blurring, dizziness, nausea, fatigue, polydipsia, and polyuria. Examination reveale...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
Young athletes who sustain a concussion are more likely to achieve a speedy recovery if they start receiving clinical care right away, according to astudy published today inJAMA Neurology. On average, athletes who were evaluated and began treatment within seven days of their head injury recovered within 51 days, compared with 66 days for athletes who were evaluated eight or more days postinjury.“[O]nce care was established, time to recovery did not differ for athletes evaluated within the first week of injury compared with those evaluated 2 to 3 weeks postinjury,” wrote Anthony Kontos, Ph.D., of the University ...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Anthony Kontos athletes concussion JAMA Neurology recovery vertigo Source Type: research
A 49-year-old female with history of daily inhaled corticosteroid use for asthma presented to a concussion clinic 7 wk after sport-related head injury with headache, visual blurring, dizziness, nausea, fatigue, polydipsia, and polyuria. Examination revealed difficulty with vestibuloocculomotor testing due to nausea and visual straining. Cranial computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging was unremarkable. Laboratory testing revealed critically low serum cortisol, hypernatremia, and urine studies suggesting diabetes insipidus. The patient was referred to the emergency department. Intravenous fluid resuscitation, corticos...
Source: Current Sports Medicine Reports - Category: Sports Medicine Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
Abstract A 49-year-old female with history of daily inhaled corticosteroid use for asthma presented to a concussion clinic 7 wk after sport-related head injury with headache, visual blurring, dizziness, nausea, fatigue, polydipsia, and polyuria. Examination revealed difficulty with vestibuloocculomotor testing due to nausea and visual straining. Cranial computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging was unremarkable. Laboratory testing revealed critically low serum cortisol, hypernatremia, and urine studies suggesting diabetes insipidus. The patient was referred to the emergency department. Intravenous fluid resus...
Source: Current Sports Medicine Reports - Category: Sports Medicine Authors: Tags: Curr Sports Med Rep Source Type: research
More News: Concussion | Head Injury | International Medicine & Public Health | Physiology | Sports Medicine | Study