Re: can prostate cancer be NICE?

In the November issue of Clinical Radiology, Richenberg offers an excellent insight into the creation and updating of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance for prostate cancer.1 With the latest edition of this guideline, and the widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to prostate biopsy in the UK, it now falls on the radiologist to make an assessment of each patient's likelihood of harbouring prostate cancer. In essence, the radiologist has now become central to the decision for prostate biopsy.
Source: Clinical Radiology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

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ConclusionIn patients with PSA serum levels of 4∼10 ng/mL, bpMRI and bpMRI combined with PSAD achieve better performance than mpMRI in detecting csPCa; bpMRI has a higher specificity than mpMRI, which could decrease unnecessary biopsy, and may serve as a potential alternative to mpMRI to optimize clinical workup.
Source: Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
In this study, the feasibility of the quantification of prostate cancer aggressiveness using parametric methods assessing [11C]-acetate kinetics was investigated in prostate cancer subjects. The underlying uptake mechanism correlated with [11C]-acetate influx and efflux measured in real-time in vitro in cell culture. Methods: Twenty-one patients with newly diagnosed low-to-moderate risk prostate cancer underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dynamic [11C]-acetate PET/CT examinations of the pelvis. Parametric images of K1 (extraction × perfusion), k2 (oxidative metabolism) and VT (=K1/k2, anabolic metabolism de...
Source: International Journal of Medical Sciences - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Int J Med Sci Source Type: research
Abstract For much of the 1990s, transrectal ultrasound systematic biopsy was the standard approach for prostate cancer diagnosis. However, in the past decade multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, multiparametric ultrasound and image fusion targeting have come to the fore. Here we present the state-of-the-art diagnostic strategies in prostate cancer detection and examine the case for target-only biopsy, as well as the benefits and limitations. PMID: 32035580 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Clinical Prostate Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol) Source Type: research
AbstractImaging plays an increasing role in prostate cancer diagnosis and staging. Accurate staging of prostate cancer is required for optimal treatment planning. In detecting extraprostatic cancer and sites of early recurrence, traditional imaging methods (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide bone scan) have suboptimal performance. This leaves a gap between known disease recurrence as indicated by rising prostate-specific antigen and the ability to localize the recurrence on imaging. Novel positron emission tomography (PET) agents including radiolabeled choline, fluciclovine (18F-FACBC), and agent...
Source: Abdominal Imaging - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Abstract Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) has been increasingly used to diagnose clinically significant prostate cancer (csPC) because of its usefulness in combination with anatomic and functional data. MRI-targeted biopsy, such as MRI-transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) fusion image-guided prostate biopsy, has high accuracy in the detection and localization of csPC. This novel diagnostic technique contributes to the development of tailor-made medicine as focal therapy, which cures the csPC while preserving the anatomical structures related to urinary and sexual function. In the early days of focal the...
Source: Clinical Prostate Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Int J Clin Oncol Source Type: research
AbstractMultiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) has been increasingly used to diagnose clinically significant prostate cancer (csPC) because of its usefulness in combination with anatomic and functional data. MRI-targeted biopsy, such as MRI-transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) fusion image-guided prostate biopsy, has high accuracy in the detection and localization of csPC. This novel diagnostic technique contributes to the development of tailor-made medicine as focal therapy, which cures the csPC while preserving the anatomical structures related to urinary and sexual function. In the early days of focal therapy, TRUS...
Source: International Journal of Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions: mpMRI can provide additional information for the detection of prostate cancer before saturation biopsies.Level of Evidence: III. PMID: 32026731 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Scand J Urol Source Type: research
ore Cavaliere Prostate cancer (PCa) is a disease affecting an increasing number of men worldwide. Several efforts have been made to identify imaging biomarkers to non-invasively detect and characterize PCa, with substantial improvements thanks to multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (mpMRI). In recent years, diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) was proposed to be directly related to tissue physiological and pathological characteristic, while the radiomic approach was proven to be a key method to study cancer imaging phenotypes. Our aim was to compare a standard radiomic model for PCa detection, built using T2-weig...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
For much of the 1990s, transrectal ultrasound systematic biopsy was the standard approach for prostate cancer diagnosis. However, in the past decade multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, multiparametric ultrasound and image fusion targeting have come to the fore. Here we present the state-of-the-art diagnostic strategies in prostate cancer detection and examine the case for target-only biopsy, as well as the benefits and limitations.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Overview Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Increasing the number of samples per target from one to two, or two to three resulted in a nonnegligible incremental detection rate of clinically significant lesions, while obtaining more than 3 cores per target provided a diminished incremental value. And performing targeted cores accurately through center of the lesions may help improve diagnostic accuracy. PMID: 32003207 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Minerva Urol Nefrol Source Type: research
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