Financial Penalty May Lead To Better Vaccination Rates, Study Shows

BOSTON (CBS) — Routine childhood vaccines are often required for entry into school, but does making vaccines mandatory actually improve immunization rates? And what if families had to pay a penalty for failing to vaccinate? A new study in the journal Pediatrics aimed to answer these questions. Researchers looked at 29 European countries and found those that legally mandate vaccinations for measles and pertussis or whooping cough, for example, had higher vaccination rates than countries that did not mandate them. In countries with mandatory vaccination that did not allow families to opt-out for religious or other non-medical reasons, there were fewer measles cases. But also, money talks. They found that countries that fined families for failing to meet the vaccination requirements had higher vaccination rates.
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before concepti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
This study explored how health is associated with legislative activity by examining whether outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles, mumps, whooping cough and chickenpox, were associated with the introduction of legislation in states to change vaccine exemption laws.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
As families face back-to-school medical requirements this month, the country feels the impact of a vaccine resistance movement decades in the making.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: your-feed-science Vaccination and Immunization Smallpox Whooping Cough Children and Childhood Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Measles Parenting Autism Medicine and Health Babies and Infants Doctors Rumors and Misinformation Centers fo Source Type: news
The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) is excited to announce that it has partnered with the Milwaukee Brewers Community Foundation topromote immunizations through public service announcements (PSA ’s) recorded in Spanish by Brewers’ catchers Yasmani Grandal and Manny Pina. In the sixty-second PSA’s, Grandal and Pina talk about importance of protecting your family by having them vaccinated against diseases like measles, mumps, whooping cough,...(see release)
Source: Wisconsin DHFS Press Releases - Category: Hospital Management Authors: Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: Anti-vaccine ideas were born with vaccines; they are abundantly spread through the Internet and social networks and can give a false impression of their basis in reality. It is time for positive action not merely a defensive approach. PMID: 31522949 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Revue des Maladies Respiratoires - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Rev Mal Respir Source Type: research
[Febrile seizures, epilepsy, migraine, diabetes, and heart disease as well as measles, chicken pox, and whooping cough in children and adolescents in Germany : Results from KiGGS Wave 2]. Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz. 2019 Sep 16;: Authors: Poethko-Müller C, Thamm R, Heidemann C, Busch M, Neuhauser H Abstract Trends of frequent chronic diseases and health problems, e.g. allergic diseases, have already been published based on the KiGGS Wave 2 study as part of the health monitoring of children and adolescents in Germany. The present work complements these ...
Source: Bundesgesundheitsblatt, Gesundheitsforschung, Gesundheitsschutz - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz Source Type: research
Preterm babies were more than 20 percent less likely to have had required shots by 19 months.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Premature Babies Babies and Infants Whooping Cough Tetanus Vaccination and Immunization Hepatitis Mumps Measles Source Type: news
[Vaccine rejection and vaccination management: the grey areasRecusa vacinal e gestão da imunização: nuances e contrastes]. Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2019;43:e54 Authors: Hortal M, Di Fabio JL Abstract Vaccinating children has been an unquestioned tradition for many years. However, there is now great concern over the growing rejection of childhood vaccination, as well as other less evident obstacles that affect vaccination coverage.Multiple factors are involved in the rejection of a specific vaccine or vaccination in general, including actions by anti-vaccination groups, as well as d...
Source: Pan American Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Rev Panam Salud Publica Source Type: research
Legislators trying to curb the numbers of unvaccinated children have been met with vigorous opposition from upset parents.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Children and Childhood Parenting Freedom of Religion Whooping Cough Medicine and Health Measles Law and Legislation Mumps Epidemics Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Centers for Disease Control Source Type: news
Christina Hildebrand went down a rabbit hole and emerged at the statehouse in Sacramento. That’s how she describes it–going down a rabbit hole–and in her case it happened 14 years ago, when she was pregnant with her first child. In a world filled with chemicals and toxins, processed foods and GMOs, she decided her baby would be brought up as naturally and chemical-free as possible. It was when she was researching how best to achieve that goal that she bumped into vaccines. That was a bad time to begin thinking about such things. The fraudulent 1998 paper by British physician Andrew Wakefield ostensibly li...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized vaccines Source Type: news
More News: Cough | Health | Legislation | Measles | Measles Vaccine | Pediatrics | Sports Medicine | Study | Vaccines | Whooping Cough | Whooping Cough (Pertussis) Vaccine