Financial Penalty May Lead To Better Vaccination Rates, Study Shows

BOSTON (CBS) — Routine childhood vaccines are often required for entry into school, but does making vaccines mandatory actually improve immunization rates? And what if families had to pay a penalty for failing to vaccinate? A new study in the journal Pediatrics aimed to answer these questions. Researchers looked at 29 European countries and found those that legally mandate vaccinations for measles and pertussis or whooping cough, for example, had higher vaccination rates than countries that did not mandate them. In countries with mandatory vaccination that did not allow families to opt-out for religious or other non-medical reasons, there were fewer measles cases. But also, money talks. They found that countries that fined families for failing to meet the vaccination requirements had higher vaccination rates.
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News Source Type: news

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The national immunisation programme is highly successful in reducing the incidence of serious and sometimes life-threatening diseases such as pneumococcal and meningococcal infections, whooping cough, diphtheria and measles. It remains important to maintain the best possible vaccine uptake to prevent a resurgence of these infections. This will also prevent increasing further the numbers of patients requiring health services, as well as outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, and allow us to provide important protection to children and other vulnerable groups. Where possible, the routine immunisation programmes should be...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This week ’s Global Vaccine Summit comes at a crucial point in history. Governments must not miss their chance to save livesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageGro Harlem Brundtland is former director-general of the World Health OrganizationElizabeth Cousens is president of the UN FoundationGoogle any list of the most successful public health interventions of this century or the last, and vaccines will be at the very top. Infectious diseases such as smallpox, measles, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough) were once prevalent and killed indiscriminately. Smallpox is now eradicated, po...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Science World Health Organization Polio World news Source Type: news
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Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Jeffrey A. SingerAs I recently wrotehere, and spoke abouthere, bans on elective surgery invoked by governors across the country in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have caused many people to suffer and even possibly face fatal consequences due to delays in necessary medical care. But there are other reasons why the public health emergency has the potential to generate secondary public health crises.In some cases people are avoiding doctors ’ offices and emergency rooms because they worry about handling theexpense at a time they have seen their income, and perhaps their savings, vanish during the current ec...
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Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Children and Childhood Parenting Measles Mumps Whooping Cough Freedom of Religion Source Type: news
GPs worried thousands may delay routine appointments due to fear of catching coronavirusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageSenior doctors fear that thousands of routine vaccination appointments may be missed or delayed because of the coronavirus lockdown, raising the risk of sudden and potentially fatal outbreaks of other diseases when restrictions on movement are finally eased.GPs and accident and emergency departments have witnessedunprecedented falls in the numbers of people seeking medical care in recent weeks, prompting concerns that vital routine immunisations for infections such as mea...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Health Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Society Science Medical research Source Type: news
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Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: your-feed-science Vaccination and Immunization Measles Whooping Cough Mumps Diphtheria Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Babies and Infants Preventive Medicine Epidemics Meningitis your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news
Right now, many people are hoping for a vaccine to protect against the new coronavirus. While that’s still on the horizon, new research suggests that families who do vaccinate their children may not be following the recommended schedule. Vaccines are given on a schedule for a reason: to protect children from vaccine-preventable disease. Experts designed the schedule so that children get protection when they need it — and the doses are timed so the vaccine itself can have the best effect. When parents don’t follow the schedule, their children may not be protected. And yet, many parents do not follow the sc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before concepti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
This study explored how health is associated with legislative activity by examining whether outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles, mumps, whooping cough and chickenpox, were associated with the introduction of legislation in states to change vaccine exemption laws.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
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