Osteoarthritis and Aging: Young Adults with Osteoarthritis

AbstractPurpose of ReviewDespite perceptions that osteoarthritis only affects older adults, many people develop osteoarthritis before 65  years of age and live decades with pain and disability. It is critical to understand why some adults develop osteoarthritis early in life and the consequences of aging with osteoarthritis.Recent FindingsOver half of people diagnosed with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis are under 65  years of age. Key risk factors are joint injury, certain occupations (e.g., tactical athletes), obesity, and aberrant hip shape. Young adults with osteoarthritis report significant mental health concerns and challenges engaging in the workforce. Primary/secondary prevention strategies need more at tention. For young adults with osteoarthritis, education and self-management strategies, particularly as part of a coordinated care strategy, may be ideal.SummaryMany people live decades with osteoarthritis and need proactive treatment strategies to delay the need for joint replacement. We urgently need to further study young adults with osteoarthritis.
Source: Current Epidemiology Reports - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research

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Authors: Ravalli S, Castrogiovanni P, Musumeci G Abstract Inactivity contributes to chronic diseases, including diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disorders, and obesity. Sedentary habits can shorten life expectancy. Exercise has been widely proposed as a valuable approach to prevention. Regular physical activity, as part of one's daily routine, may help to manage pathological conditions. This editorial especially addresses osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative disease of the articular cartilage, which is one of the most common causes of disability worldwide. Standard treatments for this illness include surgical ...
Source: World Journal of Orthopaedics - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: World J Orthop Source Type: research
Publication date: 27 April–3 May 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10182Author(s): David J Hunter, Sita Bierma-ZeinstraSummaryOsteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability and source of societal cost in older adults. With an ageing and increasingly obese population, this syndrome is becoming even more prevalent than in previous decades. In recent years, we have gained important insights into the cause and pathogenesis of pain in osteoarthritis. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis is clinically based despite the widespread overuse of imaging methods. Management should be tailored to the presenting individual and...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: This review demonstrates that nutrition can improve the symptoms of OA. Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate have shown robustly to delay the progression of knee OA in several well-designed studies, however more controlled clinical trials are needed to conclude that nutritional changes slow down the progression of the disease. PMID: 30982220 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Aging Clin Exp Res Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Self-efficacy was related to the level of education, physical activity, mobility, and comorbidity. In addition, hip problems or obesity were associated with greater difficulties in enhancing or maintaining self-efficacy. An increased focus on patients with hip problems or obesity might help to improve outcomes after supported self-management programs for osteoarthritis. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Self-efficacy increased more in younger patients and in those who opted for exercise as part of the intervention, which indicates that offering supported self-management early in the course of the disease might be...
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Source Type: research
Osteoarthritis (OA) is not limited to joint pain and stiffness, which can lead to disability; it is also linked to comorbidities such as overweight, obesity and fears and beliefs related to the pathology. The ...
Source: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Study protocol Source Type: research
Over the past few years I’ve been pondering the presumed gap between people living with pain and the people who “treat” or work with them.  Most of my readers will know that I live with widespread pain (aka fibromyalgia) or pain that is present in many parts of my body, and the associated other symptoms like DOMS that last for weeks not a day or two, and increased sensitivity to heat, cold, pressure, chilli, sound and so on. I first “came out” with my pain about 15 years ago: that is, I first disclosed to people I worked with that I had this weird ongoing pain – and finally joined...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Professional topics Research Therapeutic approaches inclusion inequality Source Type: blogs
Publication date: July 2018Source: Joint Bone Spine, Volume 85, Issue 4Author(s): Anne-Priscille Trouvin, Serge PerrotAbstractPain is an ubiquitous symptom in osteoarticular diseases, occurring much more commonly than stiffness or disability. OA of the knee, hand, or hip affects around 20% of adults in various populations and is dramatically increasing in many countries, mostly related to age and obesity, leading to an increased number of people having OA pain, and creating a huge burden related to disability and health care costs. OA-related pain, has been classically considered to be a nociceptive pain condition. Clinici...
Source: Joint Bone Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Abstract In the United States, 54.4 million adults report having doctor-diagnosed arthritis (1). Among adults with arthritis, 32.7% and 38.1% also have overweight and obesity, respectively (1), with obesity being more prevalent among persons with arthritis than among those who do not have arthritis (2). Furthermore, severe joint pain among adults with arthritis in 2014 was reported by 23.5% of adults with overweight and 31.7% of adults with obesity (3). The American College of Rheumatology recommends weight loss for adults with hip or knee osteoarthritis and overweight or obesity,* which can improve function and m...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
Authors: Riis RG Abstract Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is one of the most common causes of physical disability in the elderly population. With an increasing ageing and obese population, the prevalence of KOA is expected to rise substantially. The needs for a better understanding of the disease and tools that can predict the course of the disease, for example following treatment, are therefore imperative. 

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Source: Danish Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Dan Med J Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 6 September 2017 Source:Joint Bone Spine Author(s): Anne-Priscille Trouvin, Serge Perrot Pain is an ubiquitous symptom in osteoarticular diseases, occurring much more commonly than stiffness or disability. OA of the knee, hand, or hip affects around 20% of adults in various populations and is dramatically increasing in many countries, mostly related to age and obesity, leading to an increased number of people having OA pain, and creating a huge burden related to disability and health care costs. OA-related pain, has been classically considered to be a nociceptive pain condition. Clinicia...
Source: Joint Bone Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
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