Impact of Atopic Dermatitis Treatment on Child/Parent Sleep, Daytime Functioning, and Quality of Life.

Impact of Atopic Dermatitis Treatment on Child/Parent Sleep, Daytime Functioning, and Quality of Life. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2020 Jan 07;: Authors: Meltzer LJ, Flewelling KD, Jump S, Gyorkos E, White M, Hauk PJ PMID: 31923547 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: Atopic disorders, previously recognized as predictors of poor sleep, are associated with COPCs after accounting for sleep problems. PMID: 32975542 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Orofacial Pain - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Oral Facial Pain Headache Source Type: research
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a prevalence of 5-10% among adults in the United States, and approximately 4% among adults in Europe.1,2 AD is associated with up-regulation of type 2 immune responses (including those involving type 2 helper T cells) and skin barrier dysfunction.3-7 Clinical characterization includes the presence of pruritus (itch) and eczematous lesions, with itching, skin pain, sleep and mental health disturbances among the most common patient complaints.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Urban minority children with asthma are at increased risk for disruptions in sleep and sleep loss because of sociocontextual stressors (poverty and stressors of urban living) and challenges related to following complex asthma treatment regimens.1,2 Atopic dermatitis (AD) is frequently comorbid in children with asthma and can increase the risk of poor-quality sleep, including difficulty falling asleep, nighttime awakenings, time awake after sleep onset, difficulty awakening in the morning, and daytime sleepiness; sleep disturbance is reported in 47% to 80% of children with AD.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Urban minority children with asthma are at increased risk for disruptions in sleep and sleep loss due to socio-contextual stressors (poverty, stressors of urban living) and challenges related to following complex asthma treatment regimens.1-2 Atopic dermatitis (AD) is frequently co-morbid in children with asthma and can increase the risk for poor quality sleep, including difficulty falling asleep, nighttime awakenings, time awake after sleep onset, difficulty awakening in the morning, and daytime sleepiness; sleep disturbance is reported in 47% to 80% of children with AD.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with substantial variability of itch, skin pain1,2, sleep disturbance and fatigue3,4, variable lesional morphology5 and distribution6 and comorbid health disorders7-13. AD also has heterogeneity of triggers for itch, including heat, sweat, dryness, clothing and stress14,15. However, none of these triggers universally affected all AD patients. Yet little is known about which triggers of itch are most common in adults with AD and their predictors. In addition, little is known about the relationship of having multiple potential itch triggers and specific patterns of triggers with AD severi...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Little is known about the measurement properties of Patient-Oriented Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (PO-SCORAD) in adults with AD. Even less is known about how PO-SCORAD performs compared to the Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM). OBJECTIVE: To examine the measurement properties of PO-SCORAD and compare them with POEM. METHODS: A prospective dermatology-practice based study of 291 AD patients (age 1872 years). RESULTS: PO-SCORAD and POEM were moderately correlated with each other (Spearman rho=0.56); had weak-moderate correlations with Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) worst-itch and av...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
Urban minority with asthma are at risk for poorly controlled asthma as well as poorer sleep outcomes. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is frequently present in children with asthma and can increase risk for poor quality sleep. Our study examined sleep and asthma outcomes in urban children with asthma and whether co-existing AD increased risk for poorer asthma outcomes and sleep quality.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Atopic dermatitis (AD) impacts up to 20% of children worldwide (1;2). Children with AD experience physical discomfort, poorer quality of life (3-5), increased behavior problems (6;7), higher frequency of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (8-11) and higher healthcare utilization (12). Parents of children with AD report decreased quality of life (13-16), negative impact on the family (14;17), increased depression and anxiety (16), and increased work absenteeism (18;19).
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common childhood disorder that is associated with a variety of negative health outcomes in children and parents, including poor sleep and daytime functioning. Despite this, few studies have examined the impact of treatment for AD on sleep, and even fewer have included validated sleep questionnaires, child report of sleep disturbance, or objective measures of sleep.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Recent studies have highlighted the multidimensional effect of atopic dermatitis (AD) and urticaria. Patient burden for these conditions is largely driven by the intense itching, sleep disturbance, comorbidities, and mental health illness associated with these diseases.1-3 Immunologic, microbial, and epithelial interactions have been reported to play an important role in AD.4,5 Novel therapies and management approaches are targeting the mechanisms underlying AD and urticaria.6,7 The current issue of the Annals contains 3 outstanding reviews that update readers on the pathophysiology and evolving treatments for AD and chronic urticaria.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
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