Clonal hematopoiesis, aging, and cardiovascular diseases

Despite advances in the medical and interventional clinical management of patients, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) remain the leading cause of death worldwide. It is well appreciated that atherosclerosis represents the underlying cause of most CVDs [1]. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to the formation of atheromatous lesions in the vessel associated with increased recruitment, adhesion, and proliferation of different leukocyte subsets to the endothelium [1]. Several cardiovascular risk factors (CRFs) have been found to enhance the risk of CVD (Figure 1), including hypercholesterolemia (HC), diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, metabolic syndrome, obesity, and smoking [2].
Source: Experimental Hematology - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Review article Source Type: research

Related Links:

ConclusionsPatients with CMS were more likely to present with increased comorbidities. Patients with CMS undergoing CABG were at risk for worse short ‐term secondary postoperative outcomes and reduced long‐term survival. The data supports the need for further investigation for risk reduction surrounding operative revascularization.
Source: Journal of Cardiac Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of MetS and abnormal ECG among the studied population. Abnormal ECG findings were more common in men with no differential association in people with or without MetS. However, a significant association existed between certain components of MetS and ECG abnormalities in men only. Male gender and HDLc were independent predictors of ECG Abnormalities.Keyword: Electrocardiography, metabolic syndrome, africans.
Source: African Health Sciences - Category: African Health Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 January 2020Source: Trends in Food Science &TechnologyAuthor(s): I.P. Shanura Fernando, BoMi Ryu, Ginnae Ahn, In-Kyu Yeo, You-Jin JeonAbstractBackgroundMetabolic syndrome (MS) defines a group of severe comorbidities, including insulin resistance, abnormal fat accumulation, and high blood pressure that lead to obesity, diabetes, and heart diseases. MS has received a growing concern due to its rising prevalence in many countries. The consumption of high-calorie food, sedentary lifestyle habits, genetic factors, and stress conditions aggravate risk factors for developing metabolic syn...
Source: Trends in Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 January 2020Source: Pharmacological ResearchAuthor(s): John O. Orgah, Shuang He, Yule Wang, Miaomiao Jiang, Yuefei Wang, Emmanuel A. Orgah, Yajun Duan, Buchang Zhao, Boli Zhang, Jihong Han, Yan ZhuAbstractMetabolic syndrome, such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, atherosclerosis, and high blood pressure (HBP), are closely linked pathophysiologically. However, current monotherapies for metabolic syndrome fail to target the multifactorial pathology via multiple mechanisms, as well as resolving the dysfunctionality of the cells and organs of the body. We aimed to provide a comprehensive and ...
Source: Pharmacological Research - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Source: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy Source Type: research
ConclusionWhile this meta-analysis sheds light on possible mechanisms, further studies are necessary to determine the dominant mechanism underlying remission of T2DM following bariatric surgery.
Source: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a public health problem of great impact and significance. MetS is generally defined as a grouping of abdominal obesity, impaired glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia and hypertension and has an estimated national prevalence of approximately 34% [1,2]. The presence of MetS has been previously found to confer numerous adverse long-term health consequences, including an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, fatty liver disease and cancer [3 –6].
Source: International Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Khaing P, Pandit P, Awsare B, Summer R Abstract Obesity, diabetes mellitus, and the metabolic syndrome are important risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease, with significant impact on human morbidity and mortality. Several decades of research have accumulated considerable knowledge about the mechanisms by which metabolic conditions precipitate systemic cardiovascular diseases. In short, these mechanisms are thought to involve changes in the external environment of vascular cells, which are mediated by the pro-inflammatory effects of adipokines, free fatty acids, and hyperglycemia. Thus,...
Source: Comprehensive Physiology - Category: Physiology Tags: Compr Physiol Source Type: research
AbstractConclusive evidence demonstrates that the sympathetic nervous system activation is a hallmark of congestive heart failure. This has been shown via a variety of biochemical, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging approaches for studying human sympathetic neural function. The sympathetic activation appears to be an early phenomenon in the clinical course of the disease, closely related to its severity and potentiated by the concomitant presence of other comorbidities, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and renal failure. The adrenergic overdrive in heart failure is associated with oth...
Source: Heart Failure Reviews - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
AbstractCardiovascular diseases (CVD) are one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Testosterone (T) is an important sex hormone that triggers several genomic and non-genomic pathways, leading to improvements of several cardiovascular risk factors and quality of life in men. At the vascular level, the key effect of T is the vasorelaxation. This review discusses the molecular pathways and clinical implications of T in the vascular system. Firstly, the mechanisms involved in the T vasodilator effect will be presented. Then, it will be discussed the association of T with the main risks for CVD, namely metabolic syndrome, ...
Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
More News: Cardiology | Cardiovascular | Diabetes | Diabetes Mellitus | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Endocrinology | Heart | Hematology | Hypertension | Metabolic Syndrome | Obesity | Smokers