Capgras Syndrome in the Young: Schizophrenia or Alzheimer Disease?

Capgras Syndrome in the Young: Schizophrenia or Alzheimer Disease? Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2020 Jan 07;: Authors: Ng KP, Wong B, Xie W, Kandiah N Abstract This is a case report of an atypical presentation of early onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) in a young patient with Capgras syndrome and cognitive impairment. The concurrent onset of psychiatric and cognitive symptoms prompted a detailed evaluation for a neurodegenerative disease. A 50-year-old male lawyer presented with low mood, apathy, delusions, and auditory hallucinations over 18 months. He considered his wife as an imposter and would require her text message to confirm her identity. He became more forgetful and had to give up his law practice. His neuropsychological assessment was impaired in all domains. Genetic testing revealed homozygosity for APOEe4 alleles. His magnetic resonance imaging showed predominant parietal and medial temporal atrophy, [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed frontal, parietal and posterior temporal hypometabolism and [18F]Flutemetamol positron emission tomography was positive for amyloid deposition, leading to the diagnosis of EOAD. This case highlights EOAD as a differential diagnosis in young patients who present with Capgras syndrome. PMID: 31913960 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord Source Type: research

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Conclusions: The use of antidepressants, especially SNRIs, was associated with a shorter survival time of sCJD patients. The possible changes in neurotransmitters should be emphasized. Scientifically, this study may provide insights into the mechanism of CJD. Clinically, it may contribute to the early diagnosis of CJD.IntroductionDepression is common in the elderly. Its prevalence rate is as high as 11.19%, and this increases progressively with worsening cognitive impairment (1). The presence of depression is an acknowledged risk factor for dementia (2); it can even double the risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (3, 4)...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Einar A. Høgestøl1*, Tobias Kaufmann2, Gro O. Nygaard3, Mona K. Beyer1,4, Piotr Sowa4, Jan E. Nordvik5, Knut Kolskår2,6,7, Geneviève Richard2,6,7, Ole A. Andreassen2, Hanne F. Harbo1,3 and Lars T. Westlye2,7 1Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway 2NORMENT, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital &Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway 3Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway 4Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway 5Catosenteret Rehabilit...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
In conclusion, our data support that plasma DAO levels were increased in PSD patients and correlated with brain WMH, independent of age, gender, hypertension, and renal function. Plasma DAO levels may therefore aid in PSD diagnosis. Introduction Stroke is a risk factor for both vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease (1, 2). Functional recovery develops over the course of 26 weeks after a stroke (3), but the survivors are often left with disabilities. In addition to the sequelae of acute neuronal damage, the 1-year post-stroke dementia (PSD) rates after first-ever and recurrent stroke are ~10 and 30%, respe...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion Taken together, evidence from animal and human studies demonstrates that the brain detects levels of circulating nutrients and hormones and consequently organizes an outward response that contributes to the regulation of whole-body glucose homeostasis. However, there are major knowledge gaps about the exact nature of this response and its relative importance compared to peripheral processes. As we have seen, animal studies have provided an anatomical map of CNS glucose regulation and have identified important neurons and neural circuits involved. Additionally, the CNS sensing of key nutrients and hormones has b...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
This study employed a double-blind, randomized, crossover design, in which 24 healthy right-handed participants conducted MEG recordings during a 3-back task after administration of 2 mA tDCS or sham stimulation as a placebo. Our results showed that the effect of tDCS did not appear in the behavioral indices—WM accuracy (d′) or reaction time (RT). From the results of the time-frequency analysis, significant event-related synchronization (ERS) in the high-gamma band (82–84 Hz) of the left DLPFC was found under the tDCS condition; however, ERS was not correlated with WM capacity. Furthermore, we calculated ...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
In conclusion, while rs-fMRI use in clinical neuroradiology practice is limited, enthusiasm appears to be quite high and there are several possible avenues in which further research and development may facilitate its penetration into clinical practice. Introduction Techniques for quantifying spatial and temporal brain activity have developed rapidly since the first demonstrations that MRI could be used to measure modulations in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) tissue contrast (1). The observation that MRI could be used to monitor temporally correlated low-frequency activity fluctuations in spatially remote brain a...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Beta Amyloid Deposition Is Not Associated With Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease Tracy R. Melzer1,2,3†, Megan R. Stark1,2†, Ross J. Keenan1,4, Daniel J. Myall1, Michael R. MacAskill1,2, Toni L. Pitcher1,2,3, Leslie Livingston1,2, Sophie Grenfell1, Kyla-Louise Horne1,2, Bob N. Young1, Maddie J. Pascoe1, Mustafa M. Almuqbel1,2,4, Jian Wang5, Steven H. Marsh6, David H. Miller1,2,7, John C. Dalrymple-Alford1,2,3,8 and Tim J. Anderson1,2,3,9* 1New Zealand Brain Research Institute, Christchurch, New Zealand 2Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand 3Brain Rese...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Ivy D. Deng1, Luke Chung2, Natasha Talwar3,4, Fred Tam1, Nathan W. Churchill3, Tom A. Schweizer3,4,5,6† and Simon J. Graham1,2*† 1Physical Sciences Platform, Sunnybrook Research Institute (SRI), Toronto, ON, Canada 2Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada 3Neuroscience Research Program, Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science, Toronto, ON, Canada 4Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada 5Division of Neurosurgery, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada 6Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, Univer...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
This study therefore recruited patients with AD, PDD, and DLB, in comparison with HC, with two main objectives: (1) exploration of the disrupted glucose metabolism network topology (brain network) and comparison of related parameters, and (2) exploration of hemispheric asymmetry. Materials and Methods Participants Metabolic brain images were acquired using 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) from four groups, including 22 healthy subjects, and 22, 18, and 22 patients with AD, PDD, and DLB, respectively. Subjects were recruited from the PET Center of Huashan Hospital, Shanghai, Chi...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions: These findings support the notion that MS patients exhibit an altered multisensory perception in the SiFi task and that their susceptibility to the perceptual illusion is negatively correlated with their neuropsychological test performance. Since MS lesions affect white matter tracts and cortical regions which seem to be involved in the transfer and processing of both crossmodal and cognitive information, this might be one possible explanation for our findings. SiFi might be considered as a brief, non-expensive, language- and education-independent screening test for cognitive deficits in MS patients. Intr...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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