The sigmoid take-off: An anatomical imaging definition of the rectum validated on specimen analysis

ConclusionThe sigmoid take-off has been validated on specimen analysis to be an imaging landmark that defines the termination of the rectum. This anatomical landmark can be used to classify tumours and guide treatment and research of sigmoid colon and rectal cancer.
Source: European Journal of Surgical Oncology (EJSO) - Category: Surgery Source Type: research

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Abstract During the last two decades a neoadjuvant treatment concept has been established for an increasing number of malignant tumors of the gastrointestinal tract; however, these concepts are still subject to a constant change concerning the indications and type of treatment. A prime example for this is rectal cancer. The rate of local recurrence in particular was significantly reduced by neoadjuvant therapy but until now it has not been possible to validly show an improvement in overall or disease-free survival. At the beginning of the millennium it was recommended to treat every rectal carcinoma...
Source: Der Chirurg - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Chirurg Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewContrarily to what happens with rectal cancer, the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the assessment of colon cancer has been limited. However, we may witness a ‘paradigm shift’ in the future. Classically, colon cancer has been assessed by computed tomography (CT) which is considered the workhorse for evaluating this neoplasm as it provides insights not only about local and regional disease as well as about distant metastases. However, as the accuracy o f CT is somewhat limited, recent reports about the use of MRI in colon cancers have been published. In this review we will ass...
Source: Current Colorectal Cancer Reports - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Yikan Cheng1†, Yan Ma1†, Jian Zheng1†, Hua Deng2†, Xueqin Wang3,4, Yewei Li3,4, Xiaolin Pang1, Haiyang Chen1, Fang He1, Lei Wang5*, Jianping Wang5* and Xiangbo Wan1* 1Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Colorectal and Pelvic Floor Diseases, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangdong Institute of Gastroenterology, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Banner-University Medical Center Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, United States 3Department of Statistical Science, Southern China Center for Statistical Science, School of Mathe...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
ConclusionsLaparoscopic-assisted modified intersphincter resection for ultralow rectal cancer is safe and feasible. This technique should be considered whenever possible as a means to offer sphincter preservation and improve sphincter function in patients with ultralow rectal cancer.
Source: Annals of Surgical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
ConclusionThe majority of surveyed surgeons use MRI for pelvic staging and discuss rectal cancer cases at multidisciplinary cancer conference. Many are using minimally invasive techniques; however, the use of taTME is not yet widespread. Surgeons currently favor longer intervals from neoadjuvant chemoradiation to surgery, and the management strategy for patients with complete clinical response remains controversial. Great variability exists in rectal cancer management, thus presenting an opportunity for improvements by adopting standardization and centralization of rectal cancer management.
Source: Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic-assisted modified intersphincter resection for ultralow rectal cancer is safe and feasible. This technique should be considered whenever possible as a means to offer sphincter preservation and improve sphincter function in patients with ultralow rectal cancer. PMID: 29340993 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Ann Oncol - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Ann Surg Oncol Source Type: research
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2017; 30: 297-312 DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1606107Modern rectal cancer management is dependent on preoperative staging, and radiological assessment is a crucial part of this process. Imaging must provide sufficient information to guide preoperative decision-making that is reliable and reproducible. Different methods have been used for local staging; however, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown to be the most reliable tool for this purpose. MRI offers prognostic information about the patients and guides the decision between neoadjuvant treatment and total mesorectal excision alone. Also...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
ConclusionsA logistic model including risk factors for LPLN metastasis and MRI findings had significantly better performance for prediction of LPLN metastasis compared with a model based on MRI findings alone.
Source: International Journal of Colorectal Disease - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Abstract Endometrial cancer in the lower uterine segment (LUS) is associated with Lynch syndrome with MLH1 or MSH2 germline mutation. Here, we report a case of carcinoma of the LUS diagnosed with Lynch syndrome based on MSH6 germline mutation in a 46‐year‐old woman with abnormal vaginal bleeding. She had had rectal cancer at age 39 with a family history of colon cancer (father, 75 years), pancreatic cancer (paternal grandmother, 74 years), and colon cancer (maternal grandmother, 85 years). Magnetic resonance imaging showed a tumor in the LUS. Endometrial biopsy revealed endometrioid adenocarcinoma G1. As her cancer his...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
The use of imaging in colorectal cancer (CRC) has significantly evolved over the last twenty years, establishing important roles in surveillance, diagnosis, staging, treatment selection and follow up. The range of modalities has broadened with the development of novel tracer and contrast agents, and the fusion of technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT). Traditionally, the most widely used modality for assessing treatment response in metastasised colon and rectal tumours is CT, combined with use of the RECIST guidelines. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that tumour si...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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